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2017 G7 Taormina Summit
Final Compliance Report

27 May 2017 to 25 May 2018
Katrina Bland, Andrew Liu and Sarah Mariani
G7 Research Group

4 June 2018

The 2017 G7 Taormina Summit Final Compliance Report reviews progress made on 19 selected commitments set out at the 2017 Taormina Summit for the period of 27 May 2017 to 25 May 2018 (see Table A). This is three more commitments more than the interim compliance report assessed. The preface and summary of the findings are listed below. The 2017 G7 Taormina Final Compliance Scores, with rankings by country and by issue.

Download the full 368-page report here.

The report contains the following sections, which can be downloaded separately:

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Preface

Each year since 1996, the G7 Research Group has produced a compliance report on the progress made by the G7 members in meeting the commitments their leaders issue at each summit. Since 2002, the group has usually published an interim report to assess progress during the transition from one host to the next, in addition to the final report issued just before the annual summit. These reports, which monitor the implementation of a carefully chosen selection of the many commitments announced at the end of each summit, are offered to the general public and to policy makers, academics, civil society, the media and interested citizens around the world in an effort to make the work of the G7 more transparent and accessible, and to provide scientific data to enable meaningful analysis of this unique and informal institution. Compliance reports are available at the G7 Information Centre at www.g7.utoronto.ca/compliance.

Based at the University of Toronto and founded in 1987, the G7 Research Group strives to be the leading independent source of information and analysis on the institutions, performance, issues and participants of the G7 summit and system of global governance. It is an global network of scholars, students and professionals. The group oversees the G7 Information Centre, which publishes freely available research on the G7 as well as official documents issued by the G7.

For the final compliance report on the 2017 Taormina Summit, hosted by Italy from 26 to 27 May 2017, 19 priority commitments were selected from the total 180 commitments made. This final report includes assessments for 19 of those commitments as of 25 May 2018, three more than were assessed in the 2017 G7 Taormina Interim Compliance Report.

To make its assessments, the G7 Research Group relies on publicly available information, documentation and media reports. To ensure the accuracy, comprehensiveness and integrity of these reports, we encourage comments and suggestions. Indeed, this is a living document, and the scores can be recalibrated if new material becomes available. All feedback remains anonymous and is not attributed. Responsibility for this report's contents lies exclusively with the report's authors and the analysts of the G7 Research Group.

This report is produced entirely on a voluntary basis. It receives no direct financial support from any source, by a process insulated from the other major activities of the G7 Research Group, such as the "background book" produced by GT Media or the pre-summit conferences sponsored by various institutions.

The work of the G7 Research Group would not be possible without the steadfast dedication of many people around the world. This report is the product of a team of energetic and hard-working analysts led by Katrina Bland, chair of summit studies, and Andrew Liu and Sarah Mariani, chief co-compliance officers, and their team of lead analysts and analysts. It would also not be possible without the support of Dr. Ella Kokotsis, director of accountability, and Brittaney Warren, senior researcher. We are also indebted to the many people who provide feedback on our drafts, whose comments have been carefully considered in this report.

John Kirton
Director
G7 Research Group

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Executive Summary

The University of Toronto G7 Research Group's Final Compliance Report on the 2017 Taormina Summit assesses the compliance of the G7 members with 19 priority commitments selected from the total 180 made at Taormina on 26-27 May 2017 (See Table A). This selection reflects the breadth and focus of the summit agenda. The analysis covers actions taken by G7 members since 28 May 2017, the day after the summit, until 25 May 2018. Note that this final compliance report assesses three commitments not included in the interim compliance report published on 20 April 2018.

The Final Compliance Score

Compliance is measured on a three-point scale. A score of +1 indicates full compliance with a commitment, a score of 0 indicates partial compliance, and a score of −1 indicates non-compliance as in a failure to comply or action taken that is directly opposite to the commitment. The interim compliance scores are listed in Table B.

For the period of 28 May 2017 to 25 May 2018, the average compliance score for the selected 19 commitments was +0.60 (80%). This is an increase from the 2017 interim compliance score of +0.44 (72%), which measured compliance during the period of 28 May 2017 to 30 January 2018, and also from the final compliance score of +0.49 (75%) for the 2016 Ise Shima Summit. It is, however, a decrease from the 2015 Schloss Elmau Summit final compliance score of +0.68 (84%).

Compliance by Member

The European Union ranked first with an average score of +0.95 (97%) followed by the United Kingdom at +0.84 (92%), and Canada and France both at +0.68 (84%). The United States had the lowest score at +0.17 (58%). The U.S. average is calculated from 18 commitments as it was not included in the commitment on the Paris Agreement. See Table C for a complete list of country scores.

Compliance by Commitment

The commitment on aviation and border security in terrorism had the highest score at +1.00 (100%) (see Table D). This was followed by the commitments on information and communications technologies and on Ukraine both at +0.88 (94%). Five commitments followed at +0.75 (88%): on online extremism, trade protectionism, environmental standards, food security and nutrition, and the African Union's Agenda 2063. They were followed by the commitment on the Paris Agreement, which was assessed for all G7 members except the United States, and had a score of +0.71 (86%). The commitment with the lowest compliance was mental health at −0.50 (25%).

The Compliance Gap Between Members

These final results from the Taormina Summit show a difference of 0.78 between the highest and lowest compliance scores, the largest gap since the 2015 interim compliance score (0.82).

Future Research and Reports

The information contained within this report provides G7 members and other stakeholders with an indication of their compliance with 19 commitments for the full year between the Taormina Summit in May 2017 and the Charlevoix Summit that will take place on 8-9 June 2018. As with previous compliance reports, this report has been produced as an invitation for others to provide additional or more complete information on country compliance. Comments are always welcomed and would be considered as part of an analytical reassessment. If so, please send your feedback to g7@utoronto.ca.

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Table A: 2017 Priority Commitments Selected for Assessment*

Number Commitment
112 "[We commit ourselves to] enhancing border and aviation security." (G7 Taormina Statement on the Fight Against Terrorism and Violent Extremism)
81 "We will counter propaganda supporting terrorism and violent extremism, online recruitment by extremists, radicalization and incitement to violence." (G7 Taormina Statement on the Fight Against Terrorism and Violent Extremism)
12 "We are determined to increase our efforts to defeat international terrorism in Syria, in particular ISIS/ISIL/Da'esh and al Qaeda." (G7 Taormina Leaders' Communiqué)
23 "We reiterate our commitment on non-proliferation and disarmament." (G7 Taormina Leaders' Communiqué)
36 "We reiterate our commitment to keep our markets open and to fight protectionism, while standing firm against all unfair trade practices." (G7 Taormina Leaders' Communiqué)
45 "[We commit to striving for better application and promotion of internationally recognized] environmental standards [throughout the global economy and its supply chains.]" (G7 Taormina Leaders' Communiqué)
179 "We agree to promote and facilitate cooperation to help ensure the effective and timely prosecution of those engaged — at any level — in human trafficking and exploitation, both domestically and internationally, including cooperation among countries of origin, transit and destination and their respective law enforcement agencies." (Roadmap for a Gender-Responsive Economic Environment)
115 "[We] encourage the private sector to value women's active role in private companies by developing positive actions, such as leadership trainings and gender equality labels/certifications, and promoting role models." (G7 Taormina Leaders' Communiqué)
46 "We agree to establish partnerships to help countries create the conditions within their own borders that address the drivers of migration, as this is the best long-term solution to these challenges" (G7 Taormina Leaders' Communiqué)
145 "[We decide to] put intersecting inequalities at the forefront of the discussions on the measures and solutions out of poverty, giving particular attention to, inter alia, age, disability, race, ethnicity, religion, family composition as the factors impacting on the social status of women." (G7 Roadmap for a Gender-Responsive Economic Environment)
64 "We are determined to harness the significant economic opportunities, in terms of growth and job creation, offered by the transformation of the energy sector and clean technology." (G7 Taormina Leaders' Declaration)
65 "Understanding this process, the Heads of State and of Governments of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United Kingdom and the Presidents of the European Council and of the European Commission reaffirm their strong commitment to swiftly implement the Paris Agreement, as previously stated at the Ise Shima Summit." (excludes United States) (G7 Taormina Leaders' Declaration)
57 "[We will encourage] public-private partnerships (PPPs)." (G7 Taormina Leaders' Communiqué)
48 "We aim to work in partnership with the African continent, supporting the African Union Agenda 2063, in order to provide the young generation in particular with adequate skills, quality infrastructures, financial resources and access to a sustainable, prosperous and safe future." (G7 Taormina Leaders' Communiqué)
69 "[We are committed to pursuing policies that advance] mental health [improvements across the globe.]" (G7 Taormina Leaders' Communiqué)
66 "We also need to address new forms of work and improve working conditions by implementing sound labor market policies and by making adjustments to our welfare systems, when necessary, in a multi-stakeholder approach, so as to provide stability for our labor force." (G7 Taormina Leaders' Communiqué)
29 "To this end, we reaffirm our commitment to use all policy tools — monetary, fiscal and structural — individually and collectively to achieve strong, sustainable, balanced and inclusive growth." (G7 Taormina Leaders' Declaration)
24 "We maintain our commitment to assisting Ukraine in implementing its ambitious and yet necessary reform agenda…" (G7 Taormina Leaders' Declaration)
9 "To achieve this we must improve knowledge and competences across all sectors and regions of our countries, by fostering innovation and new skills, [with a view to boosting economic growth and to improving people's quality of life.]" (G7 Taormina Leaders' Communiqué)

* For the full list of commitments, please contact the G7 Research Group at g7@utoronto.ca.

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Table B: 2017 G7 Taormina Summit Final Compliance Scores

  Canada France Germany Italy Japan United Kingdom United States European Union Average
1. Terrorism: Aviation and Border Security +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1.00 100%
2. Terrorism: Combating Online Extremism +1 +1 +1 0 0 +1 +1 +1 +0.75 88%
3. Terrorism: Syria +1 +1 0 0 0 +1 +1 0 +0.50 75%
4. Non-proliferation: Nuclear Weapons & Disarmament 0 +1 +1 0 +1 0 +1 +1 +0.63 81%
5. Trade: Protectionism and Trade Practices +1 0 +1 +1 +1 +1 0 +1 +0.75 88%
6. Trade: Environmental Standards +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 −1 +1 +0.75 88%
7. Gender: Human Trafficking and Exploitation 0 +1 +1 0 0 +1 0 +1 +0.50 75%
8. Gender: Encouraging Women in the Private Sector +1 +1 +1 0 0 +1 0 +1 +0.63 81%
9. Gender: Intersecting Inequalities +1 0 0 0 0 0 0 +1 +0.25 63%
10. Migration: Addressing the Drivers of Migration +1 +1 +1 0 +1 +1 −1 +1 +0.63 81%
11. Climate Change: Energy and Clean Technology +1 +1 0 +1 0 +1 −1 +1 +0.50 75%
12. Climate Change: Paris Agreement +1 0 +1 +1 0 +1 N/A +1 +0.71 86%
13. Food and Agriculture: Food Security and Nutrition +1 +1 +1 −1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +0.75 88%
14. Development: African Union Agenda 2063 −1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +0.75 88%
15. Health: Mental Health 0 −1 −1 −1 −1 0 −1 +1 −0.50 25%
16. Labour and Employment: Work Conditions +1 +1 −1 +1 +1 +1 −1 +1 +0.50 75%
17. Macroeconomics: Inclusive Growth +1 0 +1 0 0 +1 +1 +1 +0.63 81%
18. Regional Security: Ukraine 0 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +0.88 94%
19. Information and Communication Technology +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 0 +1 +0.88 94%
2017 Final Compliance Average +0.68 +0.68 +0.63 +0.37 +0.47 +0.84 +0.17 +0.95 +0.59 80%
84% 84% 82% 68% 74% 92% 58% 97%
2017 Interim Compliance Average 72% 75% 72% 66% 63% 78% 57% 97% 73%
2016 Final Compliance Average 79% 63% 83% 61% 64% 76% 82% 83% 75%
2016 Interim Compliance Average 77% 64% 77% 59% 59% 82% 91% 95% 76%
2015 Final Compliance Average 74% 83% 95% 62% 74% 93% 90% 100% 84%
2015 Interim Compliance Average 59% 79% 94% 59% 74% 94% 82% 100% 80%
2014 Final Compliance Average 84% 75% 88% 69% 72% 88% 88% 91% 82%

N/A = Not applicable.

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Table C: G7 Taormina Summit Final Compliance Scores by Country

  2017
final
2017
interim
2016
final
2016
interim
2015
final
2015
interim
2014
final
European Union +0.95 97% +0.94 97% +0.67 84% +0.91 96% +1.00 100% +1.00 100% +0.81 91%
United Kingdom +0.84 92% +0.56 78% +0.53 77% +0.64 82% +0.86 93% +0.88 94% +0.75 88%
France +0.68 84% +0.50 75% +0.26 63% +0.27 64% +0.67 84% +0.59 80% +0.50 75%
Canada +0.68 84% +0.44 72% +0.58 79% +0.55 78% +0.48 74% +0.18 59% +0.69 85%
Germany +0.63 82% +0.44 72% +0.67 84% +0.55 78% +0.90 95% +0.88 94% +0.75 88%
Japan +0.47 74% +0.25 63% +0.28 64% +0.18 59% +0.48 74% +0.47 74% +0.44 72%
Italy +0.37 68% +0.31 66% +0.21 61% +0.18 59% +0.24 62% +0.18 59% +0.38 69%
United States +0.17 58% +0.13 57% +0.63 82% +0.82 91% +0.81 91% +0.65 83% +0.75 88%
Average +0.60 80% +0.44 72% +0.49 75% +0.51 76% +0.68 84% +0.60 80% +0.63 82%
Spread 0.78 0.69 0.46 0.73 0.76 0.82 0.44

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Table D: 2017 Taormina Summit Final Compliance Scores by Issue

1 Terrorism: Aviation and Border Security +1.00 100%
2 Information and Communication Technology +0.88 94%
Regional Security: Ukraine
4 Terrorism: Combating Online Extremism +0.75 88%
Trade: Protectionism and Trade Practices
Trade: Internationally Recognized Environmental Standards
Food and Agriculture: Food Security and Nutrition
Development: African Union Agenda 2063
9 Climate Change: Paris Agreement +0.71 86%
10 Non-proliferation: Nuclear Weapons and Disarmament +0.63 81%
Gender: Encouraging Women in the Private Sector
Migration: Addressing the Drivers of Migration
Macroeconomics: Inclusive Growth
14 Terrorism: Syria +0.50 75%
Gender: Human Trafficking and Exploitation
Climate Change: Energy and Clean Technology
Labour and Employment: Work Conditions
18 Gender: Intersecting Inequalities +0.25 63%
19 Health: Mental Health −0.50 25%

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