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University of Toronto

The G7 Elmau Summit's Performance

John Kirton, G7 Research Group
June 29, 2022

I am grateful for the research assistance of Brittaney Warren, Duja Muhanna, Angela Hou and the other members of the G7 Research Group.

Introduction

The G7 Elmau Summit in Germany on June 26–28, 2022, produced a strong performance. Indeed, in many ways it was the strongest performance since G7 summits started in 1975.

Major Achievements

On the summit's defining challenge of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, performance was very strong. G7 leaders declared their full support for Ukraine "for as long as it takes" to win the war that Russia began four months ago. They backed their bold words with new sanctions on Russia, and more critical economic and military support for Ukraine.

On the central, globally existential challenge of climate change, which Germany had identified as its first priority at the start of its year as host for 2022, performance was strong. It was led by the endorsement of the concept of a "climate club" and the creation of several, by the G7 leaders and their guest colleagues from India, Indonesia, South Africa, Argentina and Senegal when they met on June 27, the summit's second day.

On the third key issue of controlling the continuing COVID-19 pandemic through immediate actions and by strengthening the global health architecture as a whole, performance was strong. Achievements were led by the launch on June 26, the summit's first day, of the Partnership on Global Infrastructure and Investment (PGII), to mobilize $600 billion in the coming years for developing and emerging countries to build modern health infrastructure, such as hospitals, primary healthcare centres, cold storage and transportation facilities to keep COVID-19 vaccines effective as they reached those who needed them the most, and even potentially, to allow poor countries to produce and invent safe, effective, affordable vaccines of their own. The PGII also reinforced health and other G7 priorities by highlighting environmental and digital infrastructure as the emphasis, along with the traditional transportation infrastructure of port, bridges, roads and railroads that has new importance in overcoming the broken links in the global supply chains that have fuelled inflation, restricted trade, and harmed the jobs and incomes of those who depend on it.

On the fourth important challenge of the economy and finance, performance as significant. They properly focused first on the current declining economic growth and soaring inflation, and identified Russia's invasion of Ukraine as a key cause and its end as the key cure. They committed to "a stability- and growth-oriented macroeconomic policy mix, which ensures medium-term sustainability of public finances and preserves the resilience of the financial sector."

Summit Shortcomings

To be sure, there were several shortcomings, especially where the Elmau Summit's strong supply of global governance did not keep up with the greater growing global demand and need for it.

On Ukraine, there was little specificity on what new weapon supplies and systems the G7 governments would now give Ukraine, although some of such details were more appropriately left to be announced at the summit of the leaders of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in Madrid the following day.

On climate change, leaders did not commit to increase their targets and timetable to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions in keeping with what the latest scientific evidence showed they should. They did not promise to produce themselves now for developing countries the overdue climate finance of $100 billion a year. Nor did they promise to end their fossil fuel subsidies now, another pledge now long overdue.

In responding to the current energy crisis, there was insufficient emphasis on conservation, the supply of the reliable renewable energy sources of wave, tidal and geothermal power, and the supply of heat pumps, such as those just proliferating from the US president Joe Biden invoking the Defence Production Act in support, and measures G7 leaders had used in 1979 and 1980 to counter the energy shock of that time.

In their approach to nature-based solutions, there was no reference to the value of preserving peatlands or the critical role of Indigenous peoples in combatting climate change and biodiversity loss.

On the economy, on the critical instrument of creating a new international corporate tax regime, there was only one general commitment, with no promise of additional actions to help the G20-agreed regime be implemented starting now.

Dimensions of Performance

Still, the Elmau Summit's historically strong supply of global governance, relative to all G7 summits before, is confirmed by its new highs on the key dimensions of performance by which all G7 summits all plurilateral summit institutions can be judged and compared (see Appendix A).

Deliberation

On the initial dimension of deliberation, whose public component is measured by the number of documents and words the leaders produce in their summit's public communiqués, Elmau leaders produced nine separate documents, containing 19,179 words in all. They were led by the central 27-page G7 Leaders' Communiqué on June 28 with 12,089 words. Then came the G7 Statement of Support for Ukraine on June 27 with 2,415 words. The G7 Statement on Global Food Security issued on June 28 had 1,192 words and the 2022 Resilient Democracies Statement on June 27 had 1,088 words. Then came the executive summary of the communiqué of June 28 with 725 words, the G7 Chair's Summary: Joining Forces to Accelerate Clean and Just Transition towards Climate Neutrality on June 27 with 593 words, the G7 Statement on Climate Club with 518 words, the annex to the statement on Ukraine with 434 words, and the G7 Leaders' Statement on the Missile Attack on a Shopping Mall in Kremenchuck with 125 words.

By subject, Ukraine led with three separate documents, followed by climate change with two, and food, and democracy with one each.

The total of 19,179 words in Elmau's outcome documents was among the highest in G7 summit history, exceeded only by those from 2004 to 2007, 2009, 2016, and 2021. It was almost double the overall per summit average of 10,166.

On the defining subject of Ukraine, the Elmau leaders produced 4,927 words. This was far more than the previous highs at their special summits in 2022 on March 24 with 963 words, on May 8 with 879 words, and on February 24 with 687 words, and at their previous annual summit in June 2021 at Cornwall in the United Kingdom with 331 words.

Decision Making

On the critical dimension of decision making, measured first by the number of collective, precise, future-oriented, political binding leaders produce and publicly record in their summit outcome documents, the Elmau Summit produced 547 commitments (see Appendix B). This was by far the highest number produced by any G7 summit, well above the previous high of 429 commitments at last year's Cornwall Summit. It was over four times as many as the average of 125 commitments at each of the 47 summits before Elmau.

By subject, the 547 Elmau commitments were led by those on regional security with 63, a category dominated by Russia's war against Ukraine. Climate change came a close second, with 58 commitments. In third place was energy, a subject closely related to both of those above, with 51 commitments.

Then came commitments on the G7's two distinctive foundational missions: human rights with 44 and democracy with 42.

That was followed by health with 41, the environment with 46, food and agriculture with 35, the digital economy with 25, gender with 22, and trade and macroeconomic policy with 19 each. A broader range of 13 subjects, spanning the security, ecological, social and economic domains, each had 19 commitments or more.

Money Mobilized

On the cross-cutting dimension of money mobilized, Elmau raised a total of $610.59 billion (see Appendix C). This was far more than any previous G7 summit and more than twice as much as the $252 billion raised at the Gleneagles Summit in 2005, which focused on debt, aid, trade and AIDS.

For and at Elmau, the money mobilized was led by $600 billion promised by the G7 to mobilize from public and private sources for the PGII, which most G7 leaders announced at a side event at Elmau on the summit's first day. This was followed in volume by $4.5 billion to "protect the most vulnerable from hunger and malnutrition," announced in the statement on global food security, and $3.5 billion to support Ukraine.

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Appendix A: G7 Summit Performance, 1975–2022

Year

Grade

Domestic
political management

Deliberation

Direction setting

Decision making

Delivery

Development
of global governance

Participation

# communiqué compliments

Spread

# days

# statements

# words

# references
to core values

# commitments

Compliance

# assessed

# ministerials
created

# official-level
groups created

# members

# participating
countries

# participating
international
organizations

1975

A−

2

29%

3

1

1,129

5

14

+0.08

0

1

6

0

0

1976

D

0

0%

2

1

1,624

0

7 1

 

0

0

7

0

0

1977

B−

1

13%

2

6

2,669

0

29

 

0

1

8

0

0

1978

A

1

13%

2

2

2,999

0

35

+0.14

3

0

0

8

0

0

1979

B+

0

0%

2

2

2,102

0

34

 

1

2

8

0

0

1980

C+

0

0%

2

5

3,996

3

55

 

0

1

8

0

0

1981

C

1

13%

2

3

3,165

0

40

0

2

1

0

8

0

0

1982

C

0

0%

3

2

1,796

0

23

−0.71

1

0

3

9

0

0

1983

B

0

0%

3

2

2,156

7

38

−0.56

2

0

0

8

0

0

1984

C−

1

13%

3

5

3,261

0

31

−0.47

2

1

0

8

0

0

1985

E

4

50%

3

2

3,127

1

24

+0.27

2

0

2

8

0

0

1986

B+

3

25%

3

4

3,582

1

39

−0.43

1

1

1

9

0

0

1987

D

2

13%

3

7

5,064

0

53

+0.29

1

0

2

9

0

0

1988

C−

3

25%

3

3

4,872

0

27

 

0

0

8

0

0

1989

B+

3

38%

3

11

7,125

1

61

−0.07

4

0

1

8

0

0

1990

D

3

38%

3

3

7,601

10

78

−0.11

4

0

3

8

0

0

1991

B−

1

13%

3

3

8,099

8

53

+0.38

2

0

0

9

1

0

1992

D

1

13%

3

4

7,528

5

41

+0.71

3

1

1

8

0

0

1993

C+

0

0%

3

2

3,398

2

29

+0.57

2

0

2

8

1

0

1994

C

1

13%

3

2

4,123

5

53

+0.71

2

1

0

8

1

0

1995

B+

3

25%

3

3

7,250

0

78

+0.29

1

2

2

8

1

0

1996

B

1

13%

3

5

15,289

6

128

+0.42

23

0

3

8

1

4

1997

C−

16

88%

3

4

12,994

6

145

+0.26

11

1

3

9

1

0

1998

B+

0

0%

3

4

6,092

5

73

+0.42

13

0

0

9

0

0

1999

B+

4

22%

3

4

10,019

4

46

+0.45

10

1

5

9

0

0

2000

B

1

11%

3

5

13,596

6

105

+0.74

29

0

4

9

4

3

2001

B

1

11%

3

7

6,214

3

58

+0.47

20

1

2

9

0

0

2002

B+

0

0%

2

18

11,959

10

187

+0.36

24

1

8

10

0

0

2003

C

0

0%

3

14

16,889

17

206

+0.61

20

0

5

10

12

5

2004

C+

0

0%

3

16

38,517

11

245

+0.53

33

0

15

10

12

0

2005

A−

8

67%

3

16

22,286

29

212

+0.65

28

0

5

9

11

6

2006

B+

6

44%

3

15

30,695

256

317

+0.40

28

0

4

10

5

9

2007

B+

12

100%

3

8

25,857

86

329

+0.54

31

0

4

9

9

9

2008

B+

8

78%

3

6

16,842

33

296

+0.46

29

1

4

9

15

6

2009

B

13

67%

3

10

31,167

62

254

+0.54

26

2

9

10

28

10

2010

C

10

89%

2

2

7,161

32

44

+0.53

20

0

1

10

9

0

2011

B+

14

67%

2

5

19,071

172

196

+0.55

18

1

0

10

7

4

2012

B+

7

67%

2

2

3,640

42

81

+0.55

22

0

1

10

4

1

2013

B+

13

60%

2

4

13,494

71

214

+0.58

25

0

0

10

6

1

2014

B

6

44%

2

1

5,106

42

141

+0.68

21

1

0

9

0

0

2015

B+

2

25%

2

2

12,674

20

376

+0.63

31

1

4

9

6

6

2016

B−

22

63%

2

7

23,052

95

342

+0.45

23 

 1

1

9

7

5

2017

B

2

25%

2

4

8,614

158

180

+0.57

21

1

2

9

5

6

2018

B+

0

0%

2

8

11,224

56

315

+0.64

30

1

 

9

12

4

2019

B−

6

57%

3

10

7,202

 

71

+0.52

22

1

0

9

8

8

2020 Mar. US

 

0

0

 

1

795

0 (1)*

25

n/a

n/a

0

0

9

8

4

2021 Feb. UK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2021 Cornwall

 

4

2%

3

3

20,677

130

429

+0.81

22

0

0

9

4

 

2022 Feb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022 Mar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022 Elmau         19,179   547         9 5 8

Overall total (1975–2021)

191

15.57%

122

254

477,792

1,400

5,857

 

567

21

101

411

178

91

Overall average 1975–2021)

4.1

0.3%

2.7

5.4

10,165.8

31.1

124.6

+0.4

14.9

0.5

2.3

8.7

3.8

2.0

Notes:
N/A = not available.
Grade: Kirton scale is A+ = extremely strong, striking, standout, historic; A = very strong; A− = strong; B+ = significant; B = substantial; B− = solid; C = small; D = very small; F = failure (including made things worse).
Domestic political management: # communiqué compliments = the number of favourable references to G7/8 members by name. Spread = number of G7/8 members complimented.
Deliberation: # days = the duration of the summit; # statements = number of official statements issued in the leaders' name; # words = number of words contained in the official statements.
Direction setting: # affirmations of G7/8 core values of open democracy, individual liberty and human rights contained in official documents.
Decision making: # commitments contained in the official documents.
Delivery: Compliance: compliance with selected commitments assessed as follows: 1975–1989 assessed by George von Furstenberg and Joseph Daniels; 1990–1995 assessed by Ella Kokotsis; 1996–present assessed by the G7 Research Group. # commitments: number of commitments assessed.
Development of global governance: # ministerials created = number of institutions created at the ministerial level; # official-level groups created = number of institutions created at the officials' level. Institutions are created at or by the summit, or during the hosting year, at least in the form of having one meeting take place.
Participation: # members = number of leaders of full members, including those representing the European Community from the start; Russia started as a participant in 1991 and became a full member in 1998, and stopped participating in 2014; the G4 met in 1974 without Japan and Italy and later that year the G6 (without Canada) met. # participating countries = number of full members plus number of leaders from other countries. # participating international organizations = number of heads of international organizations.

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Appendix B: G7 2022 Elmau Summit Commitments, n = 547

Subject

Total

Percentage

Leaders' Communiqué

Executive Summary

Climate Club

G7 Statement on Support for Ukraine

Annex to G7 Statement on Support for Ukraine

Chair's Summary: Joining Forces to Accelerate Clean and Just Transition towards Climate Neutrality

Democratic Resiliencies Statement

Statement on the Missile Attack on a Shopping Mall in Kremenchuck

Statement on Global Food Security

Regional security

63

12%

19

9

 

28

3

 

 

4

 

Climate change

58

11%

41

4

4

 

 

4

5

 

 

Energy

51

9%

32

4

 

3

 

10

2

 

 

Human rights

44

8%

24

3

 

13

 

 

3

1

 

Democracy

42

8%

15

4

 

1

 

 

22

 

 

Health

41

7%

35

2

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

Environment

36

7%

33

 

 

2

 

 

1

 

 

Food and agriculture

35

6%

4

4

 

2

 

 

1

 

24

Digital economy

25

5%

23

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

Gender

22

4%

18

1

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

Trade

19

3%

11

1

 

6

 

 

1

 

 

Macroeconomics

19

3%

14

3

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

Crime and corruption

16

3%

6

 

 

6

 

 

4

 

 

Peace and security

15

3%

2

1

1

 

 

 

11

 

 

Development

14

3%

11

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

Labour and employment

13

2%

13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Infrastructure

8

1%

5

1

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

Non-proliferation

7

1%

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

International cooperation

6

1%

5

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Terrorism

3

0.5%

2

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

Social policy

3

0.5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

IFI/IGO reform

2

0.3%

1

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

International taxation

2

0.3%

1

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

Social policy

1

0.2%

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accountability

1

0.2%

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

Total

547

100%

324*

38

5

65

3

14

69

5

24

Notes: IFI = international financial institutions; IGO = international governmantal organization.
*missing one (adds up to 323), to be confirmed.

G7 Leaders' Communiqué

  1. As open democracies adhering to the rule of law, we are driven by shared values and bound by our commitment to the rules-based multilateral order (democracy)
  2. [As open democracies adhering to the rule of law, we are driven by shared values and bound by our commitment to]…universal human rights. (human rights)
  3. we will continue to impose severe and immediate economic costs on President Putin's regime for its unjustifiable war of aggression against Ukraine, while stepping up our efforts to counter its adverse and harmful regional and global impacts, including with a view to helping secure global energy and food security as well as stabilising the economic recovery. (regional security)
  4. At a time when the world is threatened by division, we will jointly assume our responsibility and work with partners around the world to find solutions to pressing global challenges such as tackling climate change (climate change)
  5. [At a time when the world is threatened by division, we will jointly assume our responsibility and work with partners around the world to find solutions to pressing global challenges such as]…securing a just transition (energy)
  6. [At a time when the world is threatened by division, we will jointly assume our responsibility and work with partners around the world to find solutions to pressing global challenges such as]…addressing the current and future pandemics (health)
  7. [At a time when the world is threatened by division, we will jointly assume our responsibility and work with partners around the world to find solutions to pressing global challenges such as]…achieving gender equality. (gender)
  8. We were joined in Elmau by the Leaders of Argentina, India, Indonesia, Senegal and South Africa, with whom we are united in our commitment to protect and strengthen our democracies (democracy)
  9. [We were joined in Elmau by the Leaders of Argentina, India, Indonesia, Senegal and South Africa, with whom we are united in our commitment to]… jointly address global challenges in close cooperation with other international partners and organisations. (international cooperation)

A Sustainable Planet

Climate and Energy

  1. We reaffirm our unwavering commitment to the Paris Agreement, and its strengthened implementation. (climate change)
  2. We highlight the increased urgency to act to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by around 43 per cent by 2030, relative to the 2019 level, in light of the latest findings of the IPCC, in order to limit global warming to 1.5 °C. (climate change)
  3. As a response and in the run up to COP 27, we commit to urgent, ambitious, and inclusive action in this decade (climate change)
  4. We also commit to keep a limit of 1.5 °C temperature rise within reach (climate change)
  5. [We also commit to]…enhance resilience and adaptive capacity to the impacts of climate change (climate change)
  6. [We also commit to]…align financial flows with the goals of the Paris Agreement. (climate change)
  7. We will fully play our part in urgently implementing the Glasgow Climate Pact. (climate change)
  8. We strongly support and recall its request to Parties to revisit and strengthen the 2030 targets in their Nationally-Determined Contributions (NDCs) as necessary to align with the Paris Agreement temperature goal by the end of 2022. (climate change)
  9. We will effectively implement domestic mitigation measures to achieve our NDC targets (climate change)
  10. [We]…commit to increase our ambition, including for example, by adopting or strengthening sectoral targets, non-CO2 sub-targets, or stringent implementation measures. (climate change)
  11. We commit to enhance our support for developing countries in updating and implementing their NDCs and Long-Term Strategies, including through our contribution to multilateral funds or bilateral support. (climate change)
  12. Enhancing action and support for adaptation and resilience in vulnerable countries, we will work towards ambitious results for a global goal on adaptation. (climate change)
  13. We recognise the adverse effects of climate change and environmental degradation on peace, stability, and security, and will work together with the global community to counter these impacts.  (climate change)
  14. We will continue to coordinate on the most appropriate economic and fiscal policies to support decarbonisation in an efficient, effective, and equitable way. (climate change)
  15. We commit to a highly decarbonised road sector by 2030 including by, in this decade, significantly increasing the sales, share and uptake of zero emission light duty vehicles, including zero emission public transport and public vehicle fleets. (climate change)
  16. We commit to support a Paris-compatible global goal on net-zero emissions from international aviation no later than 2050 (climate change)
  17. [We commit to]…strengthen global efforts to achieve net-zero emissions from international shipping by 2050 at the latest. (climate change)
  18. We will continue to be mindful with regards to our long-term drive towards alternative fuels for transport, to our objectives on climate and biodiversity and food security. (climate change)
  19. We commit to reduce emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFC) throughout the life cycle (energy)
  20. Reaffirming our commitment to the Global Methane Pledge, we will step up efforts to collectively reduce global anthropogenic methane emissions by at least 30 per cent below 2020 levels by 2030. (energy)
  21. To this end, we commit to implementing with others clear policies and strategies to align financial flows with our climate and biodiversity objectives (climate change)
  22. [We]…are committed to mobilising resources from all sources. (climate change)
  23. We renew our strong commitment and will intensify our efforts to delivering on the collective USD 100 billion climate finance mobilisation goal as soon as possible and through to 2025. (climate change)
  24. Building upon the Climate Finance Delivery Plan, we will demonstrate progress on the report's collective actions ahead of COP 27 to reinforce confidence that it will be met in 2023. (climate change)
  25. We commit to working alongside others towards the implementation of the Glasgow Climate Pact's call to collectively at least double the provision of climate finance for adaptation to developing countries from 2019 levels by 2025. (climate change)
  26. We recognise the urgent need for scaling-up action and support to avert, minimise, and address loss and damage particularly in vulnerable developing countries. (climate change)
  27. We commit to scale up climate and disaster risk finance and insurance (CDRFI) (climate change)
  28. [We]…will work towards a Global Shield against Climate Risks, building on the InsuResilience Global Partnership and other initiatives. (climate change)
  29. We ask our Development Ministers to make progress on the Global Shield by COP 27. (climate change)
  30. We are committed to mobilising resources from all sources and to substantially increasing our national and international funding for nature by 2025 to support the implementation of an ambitious global framework. (environment)
  31. We commit to enhance synergies between finance for climate and biodiversity, including increased funding for Nature-based Solutions. (environment)
  32. We commit to ensure our international development assistance does no harm to nature by 2025, and delivers positive outcomes overall for people, climate, and nature. (environment)
  33. We call on multilateral development banks (MDBs) to further strengthen ambitious climate…action (climate change)
  34. [We call on multilateral development banks (MDBs) to further strengthen ambitious]…biodiversity [action.] (environment)
  35. To this end, we call upon MDBs to develop methodologies for Paris alignment before UNFCCC COP 27 (climate change)
  36. [To this end, we call upon MDBs to]…enhance the mobilisation of private finance (climate change)
  37. [To this end, we call upon MDBs to]… support regulatory reforms via development policy operations (climate change)
  38. [To this end, we call upon MDBs to]…increase and disclose their finance for nature, pledging concrete amounts to international biodiversity finance before CBD COP 15.2. (environment)
  39. We [stress that fossil fuel subsidies are inconsistent with the goals of the Paris Agreement and] reaffirm our commitment to the elimination of inefficient fossil fuel subsidies by 2025. (energy)
  40. Those G7 members party to the Convention on Biological Diversity also commit to redirect or eliminate incentives including subsidies harmful to biodiversity by 2030 at the latest, taking initial steps without delay. (energy)
  41. We support the implementation of the G20 Sustainable Finance Roadmap (climate change)
  42. We support the Financial Stability Board Roadmap for Addressing Climate-related Financial Risks. (climate change)
  43. We support mandatory climate-related financial disclosures (climate change)
  44. We endorse the goals of an open and cooperative international Climate Club (climate change)
  45. [We]…will work with partners towards establishing it by the end of 2022, [as laid out in our stand-alone statement.] (climate change)
  46. We are committed to counter these impacts and risks to the energy supply security of G7 members and beyond. [Russia] (energy)
  47. We are working to make sure Russia does not exploit its position as an energy producer to profit from its aggression at the expense of vulnerable countries. (energy)
  48. While taking immediate action to secure energy supply and stop the increases in energy prices driven by extraordinary market conditions, we will not compromise our climate and biodiversity goals including the energy transition nor on our commitments to phase out our dependency on Russian energy, including by phasing out or banning the import of Russian coal and oil. (energy)
  49. In coordination with the IEA, we will explore additional measures to reduce price surges and prevent further impacts on our economies and societies, in the G7 and globally. (energy)
  50. We will also provide assistance to developing countries (energy)
  51. [We]…will intensify our steps to support global energy market stability, through short term increase in our collective production, appropriate use of our energy reserves and by working with international partners to do the same. (energy)
  52. We encourage producer countries to increase their production to decrease the tension in energy markets, and in this context welcome OPEC's recent responses to tightening international markets. (energy)
  53. We will increase coordination with partners committed to bolster efficiency, stability and transparency in energy markets. (energy)
  54. We reaffirm our commitment to phase out our dependency on Russian energy. (energy)
  55. In addition, we will explore further measures to prevent Russia from profiting from its war of aggression. (regional security)
  56. As we phase out Russian oil from our domestic markets, we will seek to develop solutions that meet our objectives of reducing Russian revenues from hydrocarbons, and supporting stability in global energy markets, while minimising negative economic impacts, especially on low- and middle-income countries. (energy)
  57. We will further reduce reliance on civil nuclear and related goods from Russia, including working to assist countries seeking to diversify their supplies. (energy)
  58. We task our relevant Ministers to evaluate the feasibility and efficiency of these measures urgently. (energy)
  59. As for oil, we will consider a range of approaches, including options for a possible comprehensive prohibition of all services, which enable transportation of Russian seaborne crude oil and petroleum products globally, unless the oil is purchased at or below a price to be agreed in consultation with international partners. (energy)
  60. In considering this and other options, we will also consider mitigation mechanisms alongside our restrictive measures to ensure that most vulnerable and impacted countries maintain access to energy markets including from Russia. (energy)
  61. We task our relevant Ministers to continue to discuss these measures urgently, consulting with third countries and key stakeholders in the private sector, as well as existing and new suppliers of energy, as an alternative to Russian hydrocarbons. (energy)
  62. We will reduce our overall reliance on fossil fuels and accelerate the clean energy transition towards achieving net-zero emissions no later than 2050, keeping energy security and affordability at the core of our action. (energy)
  63. We will support partners in developing countries and emerging markets to also make their just transitions to clean energy through ambitious new development partnerships and accelerating access to financing, including through Just Energy Transition Partnerships (JETPs), supported by the G7 Partnership for Global Infrastructure and Investment (PGII). (energy)
  64. In addition, recognising the importance of national security and geostrategic interests we commit to end new direct public support for the international unabated fossil fuel energy sector by the end of 2022, except in limited circumstances clearly defined by each country consistent with a 1.5°C warming limit and the goals of the Paris Agreement. (energy)
  65. We also [emphasise the central role of and] confirm our strong financial commitment for the market ramp-up of low-carbon and renewable hydrogen and its derivatives, for hard-to-abate sectors and zero-emission thermal power generation, shifting towards a world economy based on low-carbon and renewable energy sources. (energy)
  66. We will work with all partners to ensure stable and sustainable global energy supplies. (energy)
  67. To this end, we commit to achieving a fully or predominantly decarbonised power sector by 2035. (energy)
  68. Recognising that coal power generation is the single biggest cause of global temperature increase, we commit to prioritising concrete and timely steps towards the goal of accelerating phase-out of domestic unabated coal power generation. (energy)
  69. We will increase electricity generated by renewable energies, as well as the use of renewables in all sectors (energy)
  70. [We]…commit to remove barriers and obstacles that currently hinder or slow down the expansion of renewable energies and to reduce energy consumption. (energy)
  71. Those countries that opt to use it reaffirm the role of nuclear energy in their energy mix. (energy)
  72. We will increase energy efficiency in all sectors through regulatory frameworks and incentive-based policy instruments, public and private finance, as well as public guarantees to de-risk private investments. (energy)
  73. We ask Energy Ministers to identify areas of action to enhance gender equality and diversity in the energy sector by the end of the year. (energy)

Environment

  1. Reaffirming the G7 2030 Nature Compact, we remain committed and will, leading by example, intensify ambitious action to achieve the global mission to halt and reverse biodiversity loss by 2030. (environment)
  2. We also commit to conserve or protect at least 30 per cent of land and 30 per cent of the ocean by 2030, nationally and globally, according to national circumstances and approaches. (environment)
  3. We stress the urgency of adopting a transformative Global Biodiversity Framework in 2022 and its timely implementation. (environment)
  4. We will advocate for an ambitious and effective Framework, to be adopted at the 15th Conference of the Parties of the Convention of Biological Diversity (CBD COP 15), with ambitious goals and targets, strengthened implementation, and enhanced mechanisms for review and accountability. (environment)
  5. We will act right away to implement this, submitting revised and enhanced National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans by CBD COP 16. (environment)
  6. We continue to support the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration (environment)
  7. [We]…will increase ambitious restoration initiatives nationally, regionally, and globally. (environment)
  8. We restate our commitment to achieving land degradation neutrality. (environment)
  9. We commit to mainstreaming, enhancing, and scaling up the implementation of Nature-based-Solutions (NbS) (environment)
  10. [We]…will advance the implementation of integrated One Health approaches. (health)
  11. Recognising that the global crises of climate change, biodiversity loss and pollution are mutually reinforcing, we will intensify our actions in an integrated and holistic manner. (environment)
  12. We commit to stopping and reversing the overexploitation of natural resources, ending illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing (environment)
  13. [We commit to stopping and reversing the]…degradation of the marine environment (environment)
  14. [We commit to]…combating pollution including through the sound management of chemicals and waste (environment)
  15. [We commit to]…reversing biodiversity loss (environment)
  16. [We commit to]…tackling climate change. (climate change)
  17. We commit to leading the global effort on the protection, conservation, restoration, and sustainable and equitable use of the global ocean including by the conclusion in 2022 of the legally binding instrument under the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (BBNJ). (environment)
  18. We commit to fight plastic pollution worldwide by committing to the rapid progression of negotiations towards an internationally legally binding instrument initiatied under the UNEA 5.2 resolution 5/14. (environment)
  19. To this end, we endorse the G7 Ocean Deal (environment)
  20. [we]…ask Environment Ministers to report back on progress by the end of the year. (environment)
  21. We are committed to increase resource efficiency and a circular economy to reduce environmental pressures and yield multiple benefits. (environment)
  22. To this end, we endorse the Berlin Roadmap on Resource Efficiency and Circular Economy. (environment)
  23. As key stakeholders in the global agricultural sector, we are committed to spearheading its transformation towards sustainability and resilience. (food and agriculture)
  24. Strongly determined to halt and reverse land degradation and forest loss by 2030, we will work collaboratively, share best practices and foster dialogue with all relevant stakeholders to ensure that we reach joint solutions along whole supply chains. (environment)
  25. We are committed to improving the quality and, where possible, coherence of G7 policy measures to promote sustainable supply chains. (environment)
  26. We will strengthen the agricultural sector's contribution to food security (food and agriculture)
  27. [We will strengthen the agricultural sector's contribution to]…fighting climate change (climate change)
  28. [We will strengthen the agricultural sector's contribution to]…biodiversity loss. (environment)

Economic Stability and Transformation

Global Economy and Finance

  1. Against this backdrop, we remain committed to continued coordination to minimise the impact of the war globally, as well as on our own economies and population, including by providing well-targeted support, where necessary. (macroeconomics)
  2. We reaffirm our existing G7 exchange rate commitments. (macroeconomics)
  3. We continue to strive for a strong, sustainable, balanced, gender-equal, and inclusive global recovery. (macroeconomics)
  4. We remain committed to a stability- and growth-oriented macroeconomic policy mix, which ensures medium-term sustainability of public finances and preserves the resilience of the financial sector. (macroeconomics)
  5. We will maintain and strengthen a safe, resilient, equitable, and rules-based open global economic system. (macroeconomics)
  6. We remain committed to jointly addressing challenges to long-term growth, including facilitating the net-zero… transitions, and the massive investments required  (macroeconomics)
  7. [We remain committed to jointly addressing challenges to long-term growth, including facilitating the]…digital transitions, [and the massive investments required.] (macroeconomics)
  8. We commit to mobilise high levels of private and public investments, including those in human capital, to unleash the potential for innovation (macroeconomics)
  9. [We commit to mobilise high levels of private and public investments, including those in human capital, to unleash the potential for]…productivity gains (macroeconomics)
  10. [We commit to mobilise high levels of private and public investments, including those in human capital, to unleash the potential for]…emission reduction. (climate change)
  11. This includes the need to remove structural barriers to gender equality, including through inclusive and supportive economic and fiscal policy frameworks. (gender)
  12. [Given the deteriorating and highly challenging debt situations of many developing countries and emerging markets – with more than half of low-income countries in debt distress or at high risk of debt distress –] we recognise the urgency of improving the multilateral frameworks for debt restructuring and to address debt vulnerabilities. (development)
  13. We underscore our commitment to successfully implementing the G20 Common Framework for Debt Treatments beyond the Debt Service Suspension Initiative. (development)
  14. We encourage further efforts to ensure an accelerated implementation of the G20 Common Framework and increased predictability. (development)
  15. We reaffirm our commitment to promoting transparency across all debtors and creditors, including private creditors, for improved debt sustainability. (development)
  16. We reiterate our strong political commitment to the timely and effective implementation of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) / G20 Inclusive Framework Two-Pillar Solution, to address the tax challenges arising from globalisation and the digitalisation of the economy with a view to bringing the new rules into effect at the global level. (international taxation)
  17. We will continue to provide support to developing countries for the implementation of this historic agreement. (development)

Trade and Supply Chains

  1. We stand united in our commitment to free and fair trade as foundational principles and objectives of the rules-based multilateral system with the World Trade Organisation (WTO) at its core, which proves more important than ever in the current geopolitical environment. (trade)
  2. We will continue to remove unnecessary trade barriers, including by working against trade-restrictive measures and non-market practices to maintain open and transparent markets (trade)
  3. We renew our commitment to reform the WTO to achieve a fair, predictable, and stable trade environment. (IGO reform)
  4. Our global trade rulebook must enable economic transformation, sustainable, inclusive, and resilient growth, and be responsive to the needs of global citizens. (trade)
  5. This includes reforming the WTO's functions of monitoring, negotiation, and the dispute settlement mechanism. (trade)
  6. We will further step up our efforts working towards a level playing field through more effective use of existing tools (trade)
  7. [We will further step up our efforts working towards a level playing field through]…developing stronger international rules and norms on non-market policies and practices, for example harmful industrial subsidies and trade-distorting actions by state-owned enterprises, notably those that lead to excess capacity. (trade)
  8. We will support structured discussions at the WTO, on facilitating trade in environmental goods and services, and on how trade-related climate and environmental measures can contribute to meeting our Paris and Glasgow commitments while being consistent with WTO rules and principles. (trade)
  9. Through a mix of binding and non-binding measures, we commit to advancing sustainable supply chains that are net-zero aligned and climate resilient (climate change)
  10. [Through a mix of binding and non-binding measures, we commit to advancing sustainable supply chains]…that decouple agricultural production from forest loss and land degradation (environment)
  11. [Through a mix of binding and non-binding measures, we commit to advancing sustainable supply chains]…use resources sustainably (environment)
  12. [Through a mix of binding and non-binding measures, we commit to advancing sustainable supply chains]…reduce environmental impact (environment)
  13. [Through a mix of binding and non-binding measures, we commit to advancing sustainable supply chains]…foster circularity (environment)
  14. [Through a mix of binding and non-binding measures, we commit to advancing sustainable supply chains]…promote decent work. (labour and employment)
  15. We will coordinate to maximise the coherent implementation of and compliance with international standards relating to human rights…across global supply chains (human rights)
  16. [We will coordinate to maximise the coherent implementation of and compliance with international standards relating to]…environment…[across global supply chains] (environment)
  17. [We will coordinate to maximise the coherent implementation of and compliance with international standards relating to]…labour…[across global supply chains] (labour and employment)
  18. We are committed to tackling child labour…working closely with the private sector. (human rights)
  19. [We are committed to]…ensuring decent work, including fair wages…[working closely with the private sector.] (labour and employment)
  20. We commit to accelerating progress including through our own available domestic means and multilateral institutions with a view to remove all forms of forced labour from global supply chains, including state-sponsored forced labour. (human rights)
  21. We commit to taking measures to strengthen our cooperation and collective efforts towards eradicating the use of all forms of forced labour in global supply chains, including through increased transparency and business risk advisories, and other measures to address forced labour globally. (human rights)
  22. We will align with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs) (human rights)
  23. [We will align with the]…ILO Tripartite Declaration of Principles concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy (MNE Declaration) (human rights)
  24. [We will align with the]…OECD guidelines relating to responsible business conduct (human rights)
  25. We are committed to working towards an international consensus on business and human rights to strengthen compliance with international standards, including through mandatory measures that protect rights-holders, provide for greater multilateral cooperation to address abuses, and support remedy, thus enhancing predictability and certainty for business. (human rights)
  26. Recognising where our markets are vulnerable, we will enhance collaboration, including with industry, to understand vulnerabilities and to strengthen security of critical supplies, particularly in key raw materials and critical minerals. (macroeconomics)
  27. We will also coordinate to share insights and best practice on mechanisms for identifying, monitoring and minimising vulnerabilities and logistical bottlenecks in advance of shocks, including cooperative scenario-based stress-testing. (macroeconomics)
  28. We ask our relevant Ministers, across their areas of expertise to intensify work towards building responsible, sustainable, and transparent critical minerals supply chains, and establishing a forward strategy via international cooperation‚ policy, and financial tools. (trade)
  29. More generally, and taking stock of our existing cooperation on economic security in the face of external shocks and wider risks, we commit to ongoing strategic coordination as the G7 on this matter.  (macroeconomics)
  30. We will increase our vigilance to threats, including economic coercion, that are meant to undermine global security and stability. (peace and security)
  31. To this end, we will pursue enhanced cooperation and explore mechanisms to improve assessment, preparedness, deterrence, and response to such risks, drawing upon best practice to address exposure both across and beyond the G7. (macroeconomics)

Employment and Just Transition

  1. We commit to promoting decent and high-quality work, particularly in light of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the digital and net-zero transformation on labour markets and associated demands on companies and workers. (labour and employment)
  2. To this end, we will spare no effort to train and equip all working-age adults to meet the needs of a changing labour market for a green and digital economy. (labour and employment)
  3. We therefore commit to significantly strengthening our efforts to foster continuing education training (CET) with a focus on low-skilled adults, as well as those who face systemic barriers. (labour and employment)
  4. We ask the OECD to monitor this progress. (labour and employment)
  5. By 2025, we will increase the share of our ODA employment and skills promotion programmes that is directed specifically towards green sectors and greening traditional sectors in alignment with our emerging and developing partner countries' strategies, and subject to our budgetary processes. (labour and employment)
  6. We endorse the G7 Roadmap towards Safe and Healthy Work in a Green Economy, [underline the importance of close cooperation with social partners] (labour and employment)
  7. [We]…reaffirm our commitment to improving OSH in global supply chains including by supporting the Vision Zero Fund in its work. (labour and employment)
  8. To promote continuity and prioritise coordinated action across the G7 on critical labour, social, and employment issues, we will establish a standing Employment Working Group within the G7. (labour and employment)
  9. To address these effects, we will accelerate progress towards universal, adequate, adaptive, shock-responsive, and inclusive social protection for all by 2030 in line with the UN Secretary-General's initiative for a "Global Accelerator on Jobs and Social Protection for a Just Transition", which aims to create 400 million jobs and to extend social protection. (labour and employment)
  10. We will moreover continue our intensive efforts to mitigate the social impacts of the rising energy and food prices, which have been exacerbated as a result of Russia's unprovoked and unjustifiable war of choice in Ukraine, paying special attention to disproportionately affected households. (social policy)
  11. We strive to shape the transition towards net-zero, nature positive economies and societies in a manner which contributes to our objectives of achieving decent work for all, social inclusion, the eradication of poverty, and ensuring that no one is left behind. (labour and employment)

Healthy Lives

Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness and Response

  1. To overcome the COVID-19 pandemic now, we reaffirm our commitment to enabling equitable global access to and delivery of safe, effective, quality-assured and affordable vaccines, therapeutics, diagnostics, and other essential medical goods. (health)
  2. We underline our support for all four pillars of the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A), including its COVAX facility (health)
  3. We further commit to support health sovereignty globally through the expansion of sustainable local and regional manufacturing capacity for vaccines, therapeutics, and other essential medical products in developing countries, including through technology transfer hubs (health)
  4. [We further commit to]…strengthen regulatory frameworks critical for equitable access to vaccines and other therapeutics in current and future pandemics. (health)
  5. To limit the emergence of new variants of concern and support the World Health Organisation's (WHO) global and countries' individual vaccination strategies, we stand ready to support strengthening rollout capacities and efforts to increase vaccine confidence and demand in implementing countries, especially to turn vaccines into vaccinations (health)
  6. [We]…endorse the Action Plan on COVID-19 to this end. (health)
  7. We recognise the need to foster R&D preparedness, [as illustrated by the table top exercise Every Day Counts: A Pandemic Vaccine Exercise to accelerate vaccine development against current and future pandemic threats.] (health)
  8. We will step up, align, and track our efforts on pandemic preparedness in close cooperation with WHO. (health)
  9. In this regard, we acknowledge the criticality of open and timely sharing of health data and biological samples. (health)
  10. We are also committed to spearheading research on post COVID conditions in view of their individual, social and economic repercussions. (health)
  11. In order to avoid devastating consequences of future pandemics, regain lost ground and attain universal health coverage (UHC) per the 2030 Agenda , we reaffirm our commitment to work in partnership to strengthen health systems worldwide (health)
  12. [In order to avoid devastating consequences of future pandemics, regain lost ground and attain universal health coverage (UHC) per the 2030 Agenda , we reaffirm our commitment to]…step up our efforts in pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response under the One Health approach (health)
  13. [In order to avoid devastating consequences of future pandemics, regain lost ground and attain universal health coverage (UHC) per the 2030 Agenda , we reaffirm our commitment to]…ensuring that our collective investments and measures to end COVID-19 contribute to enhancing improvements in health systems performance and global health security capacities, including in biosafety and biosecurity. (health)
  14. Acknowledging the rapid rise in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) at the global scale, we reiterate that we will spare no efforts to continue addressing this silent pandemic. (health)
  15. We will continue to promote the prudent and responsible use of antibiotics in human and veterinary medicine (health)
  16. [We will continue to]…raise awareness on sepsis (health)
  17. [We will continue to]…lead in the development of integrated surveillance systems based on a One Health approach (health)
  18. [We will continue to]…concurrently advance access to antimicrobials (health)
  19. [We will continue to]…strengthen research and innovation for new antibiotics in international partnerships (health)
  20. [We will continue to]…incentivise the development of new antimicrobial treatments with a particular emphasis on pull incentives. (health)
  21. We acknowledge the key role of the health sector in climate adaptation, and commit to making our health systems environmentally sustainable and climate-neutral at the latest by 2050, as well as more resilient. (health)

Global Health Architecture

  1. We will strengthen global pandemic readiness including by enhancing collaborative surveillance and predictable rapid response, based on a highly qualified and trained public health workforce at all levels (health)
  2. [We]…endorse the G7 Pact for Pandemic Readiness to this end. (health)
  3. Within the framework of the G7 Pact for Pandemic Readiness, we will provide support to assist at least one hundred low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) in implementing the core capacities required in the International Health Regulations (IHR) for another 5 years until 2027.  (health)
  4. We support the work of the WHO Hub on Epidemic and Pandemic Intelligence, including with a view to improving strategic foresight. (health)
  5. In light of lessons learned from COVID-19, there is no doubt that global health capacities must be underlaid with sufficient, reliable and sustainable funding. (health)
  6. We will support a successful Seventh Replenishment of the Global Fund for AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) with the goal of ending the three diseases, while contributing to achieving UHC. (health)
  7. We are strongly committed to strengthening primary health care (health)
  8. [We are strongly committed to]…continuing to address noncommunicable diseases including mental health, recognising the need for accessible and effective mental health services (health)
  9. [We are strongly committed to…continuing to address]…Neglected Tropical Diseases (health)
  10. [We are strongly committed to]…increasing our collective efforts to achieve comprehensive Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) for all. (health)
  11. We reaffirm our continuous efforts to improve women's, children's and adolescents' health by contributing to relevant funds such as the Global Financing Facility for women, children and adolescents (GFF). (health)
  12. We will continue to support polio eradication through the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI). (health)

Investment in a Better Future

Sustainable Infrastructure

  1. We will mobilise the private sector for accelerated action to this end. (infrastructure)
  2. Building on these important steps we underscore our commitment to country-led partnerships in close dialogue with interested partner countries, aligning with existing initiatives and using existing coordination mechanisms. (infrastructure)
  3. We will continue to operationalise, implement, and promote high international standards for transparency, good governance, environmental, and climate as well as financial and debt sustainability, such as the G20 Principles for Quality Infrastructure Investment. (infrastructure)
  4. [Recognising the importance of mobilising private capital for sustainable infrastructure and the key role of Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) and Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) in leveraging private capital and shaping and implementing country-led partnerships,] we will further intensify dialogue and joint action with interested partners, in particular MDBs, DFIs and private investors, to better align efforts and consolidate a pipeline of bankable projects including flagship projects reflecting G7 collaboration to narrow the infrastructure gap and drive transformational progress globally. (development)
  5. Building on our initiatives and strong commitment, and using all financial instruments at our disposal, we aim at collectively mobilising up to USD 600 billion in public and private investments with a particular focus on quality infrastructure over the next five years. (infrastructure)

Sustainable Development

  1. Recognising the particular strain multiple crises have put on developing countries we reaffirm our strong commitment to put the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda at the center of our agendas to mainstream sustainable development across all policy priorities. (development)
  2. We will accelerate our efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 by mobilising all sectors and levels of society. (development)
  3. We will spare no effort to increase global food and nutrition security (food and agriculture)
  4. [We will spare no effort to]…protect the most vulnerable whom the food crisis threatens to hit the hardest, as laid out in our Statement on Global Food Security. (food and agriculture)
  5. Guided by the objectives of the African Union (AU) Agenda 2063, we are determined to deepen our partnerships with African countries and organisations in compliance with multilateralism and the rules-based international system. (development)
  6. We reiterate our support to initiatives to strengthen the business environment and sustainable infrastructure investments in Africa. (infrastructure)
  7. We call on MDBs to urgently assess how to step up their policy and financial support, and maximise the pace of their disbursement, including of USD 170 billion committed by the World Bank Group to respond to the current crisis, to help vulnerable countries and households in response to compounding crises while preserving their credit ratings. (development)
  8. In the spirit of feminist development, foreign and trade policies and to empower women and girls, we will strengthen the rights, resources and opportunities for women and girls in all their diversity in every sphere. (gender)
  9. We [are deeply concerned about the deepening learning crisis generated by emerging conflicts and chronic emergencies worldwide, particularly for the most marginalised learners, and] stand steadfast in our commitment to protecting and prioritising girls' education. (gender)
  10. We commit to foster exchange among and with cities. (international cooperation)
  11. We task our relevant Ministers to develop a joint understanding of good urban development policy to be adopted at the first ever G7 Ministerial Meeting for Sustainable Urban Development (international cooperation)
  12. [We task our relevant Ministers to decide on]…joint initiatives for unlocking the full potential of cities to promote social, cultural, technological, climate-neutral, economic, and democratic innovation for the common good. (international cooperation)

Foreign and Security Policy

  1. We re-emphasise our support for ASEAN unity and centrality and commit to explore concrete cooperation in line with the ASEAN Outlook on the Indo-Pacific. (regional security)
  2. We strongly oppose any unilateral attempts to change the status quo by force or coercion that increase tensions. [East and South China Seas] (regional security)
  3. We urge all parties to resolve disputes over maritime claims through peaceful means consistent with international law and support using the dispute settlement mechanisms established by UNCLOS. (regional security)
  4. We [underscore the importance of peace and stability across the Taiwan Strait and] encourage a peaceful resolution of cross-Strait issues. (regional security)
  5. We remain committed to upholding fair and transparent competition in the global economy and strengthening international rules in this regard. (trade)
  6. With regard to China's role in the global economy, we are continuing to consult on collective approaches, also beyond the G7, to challenges posed by non-market policies and practices which distort the global economy. (trade)
  7. We will build a shared understanding of China's non-transparent and market-distorting interventions and other forms of economic and industrial directives. (trade)
  8. We will then work together to develop coordinated action to ensure a level playing field for our businesses and workers, to foster diversification and resilience to economic coercion, and to reduce strategic dependencies. (macroeconomics)
  9. We will continue to promote universal values, including by calling on China to respect universal human rights and fundamental freedoms, including in Tibet and in Xinjiang where forced labour is of major concern to us. (human rights)
  10. We will continue to support all efforts by ASEAN and the implementation of ASEAN's Five-Point Consensus in all its dimensions. (regional security)
  11. We also remain fully supportive of all efforts by the United Nations (peace and security)
  12. We reiterate our clear commitment that Iran must never develop a nuclear weapon. (non-proliferation)
  13. The G7 commits to working together, and with other international partners, to address the threat posed to international security by Iran's nuclear escalation. (non-proliferation)
  14. We continue to support international efforts to hold Iran to account for the unlawful shooting-down of Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752. (regional security)
  15. We reassure the people of Afghanistan of our principled support and continued humanitarian assistance and assistance to cover basic human needs, based on the respect for humanitarian principles and fundamental human rights, including women's rights. (human rights)
  16. We also reassure the people of Afghanistan the provision of swift relief, in coordination with the UN, to the communities struck by the recent earthquake. (regional security)
  17. We reaffirm our strong commitment to the UN-facilitated, Libyan-led and Libyan-owned political process and the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity and national unity of Libya. (regional security)
  18. [We reiterate that there is no alternative to an inclusive political solution on the basis of UN Security Council Resolution 2254 in Syria, and therefore] we reaffirm our full support to the UN Special Envoy Pedersen. (regional security)
  19. We will not normalise relations with the Assad regime until we witness enduring and meaningful progress in the UN-facilitated political process. (regional security)
  20. We also strongly support the re-authorisation and expansion of cross-border humanitarian assistance by the UN Security Council in July. (human rights)
  21. We remain firmly committed to pursue accountability for the Syrian regime's use of chemical weapons, human rights violations and abuses and other violations of international law, including humanitarian law. (regional security)
  22. We [welcome ongoing efforts by national jurisdictions to prosecute crimes committed in Syria, and] underscore the urgent need for progress on the fate and whereabouts of tens of thousands forcibly disappeared or arbitrarily detained Syrians and recall that accountability and justice for victims is essential for a stable, peaceful Syria. (human rights)
  23. We reaffirm our shared commitment to work towards a sustainable solution to the Syrian crisis. (regional security)
  24. We support the efforts of the Economic Community of West African States in response to the events in Mali, Burkina Faso and Guinea and the African Union in Chad. (regional security)
  25. We reiterate our strong commitment to support the populations of the Sahel countries, help stabilise the region and tackle the root causes of terrorism and instability as outlined within the Sahel Coalition. (regional security)
  26. We emphasise our commitment to work with countries and institutions in the region to foster peaceful and sustainable development in the Horn of Africa (development)
  27. [We]…will support as a priority effort to tackle one of the worst droughts in its history. (regional security)
  28. We [welcome the peaceful conclusion of the electoral process in Somalia and] reiterate our commitment to work alongside the African Union and Somali authorities to counter violent extremism and other significant challenges. (regional security)
  29. We fully support the tripartite efforts by UNITAMS, AU and IGAD (regional security)
  30. In view of the 10th Review Conference of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) in August 2022, we are united in our resolve to comprehensively strengthen the NPT (non-proliferation)
  31. [In view of the 10th Review Conference of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) in August 2022, we are united in our resolve to]…promote its universalisation (non-proliferation)
  32. [In view of the 10th Review Conference of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) in August 2022, we are united in our resolve to]…re-inforce the importance of commitments made at past Review Conferences  (non-proliferation)
  33. [In view of the 10th Review Conference of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) in August 2022, we are united in our resolve to]…advance implementation of the Treaty across all three of its mutually reinforcing pillars. (non-proliferation)
  34. The G7 reaffirms its commitment to the ultimate goal of a world without nuclear weapons with undiminished security for all, achieved through concrete, practical, and purposeful steps. (non-proliferation)
  35. We reaffirm our commitment to protecting refugees (human rights)
  36. [We reaffirm our commitment to]…supporting forcibly displaced persons (human rights)
  37. [We reaffirm our commitment to]…supporting host countries and communities (human rights)
  38. [We reaffirm our commitment to]…ensuring the full respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms of refugees (human rights)
  39. [We reaffirm our commitment to]…addressing the particular needs of women and children in conflict, crisis, and displacement. (human rights)
  40. Recalling the commitment of the Global Compact on Refugees to share responsibility more equitably, we will continue to promote international solidarity with refugees and host countries, including by expanding resettlement programmes. (human rights)
  41. We will further promote and implement the Women, Peace and Security Agenda. (gender)
  42. We will improve documentation and accountability for human rights violations and abuses, such as sexual and gender-based violence, including in conflict situations. (human rights)
  43. We reiterate the need to strengthen the implementation of international architecture to prevent and respond to conflict related sexual violence (human rights)
  44. [We]…will support the empowerment of women and girls as critical agents for conflict prevention, crisis management, conflict resolution, relief and recovery, and long-term peacebuilding. (gender)

Stronger Together

  1. We will work together with civil society and our partners internationally to strengthen the resilience of our democracies, as laid out in the 2022 Resilient Democracies Statement. (democracy)

Gender Equality

  1. We reaffirm our full commitment to a sustained focus on realising equality between women and men as well as transgender and non-binary people (gender)
  2. [We reaffirm our full commitment to]…ensuring that everyone – independent of their gender identity or expression or sexual orientation – has the same opportunities and is protected against discrimination and violence. (gender)
  3. To this end, we commit to redoubling our efforts to overcome longstanding structural barriers and to addressing harmful gender norms, stereotypes, roles, and practices. (gender)
  4. We seek to ensure full, equal and meaningful participation of women and girls in all their diversity…in politics, economics, education and all other spheres of society (gender)
  5. We seek to ensure full, equal and meaningful participation of…LGBTIQ+ persons…[in politics, economics, education and all other spheres of society] (gender)
  6. [We seek to]…consistently mainstream gender equality into all policy areas. (gender)
  7. Building on the recommendations by the Gender Equality Advisory Council as well as Women 7 we will introduce a mechanism to continuously monitor G7 commitments and progress towards achieving gender equality. (gender)
  8. To this end, we endorse the G7 Dashboard on Gender Gaps which covers key indicators across a range of policy areas that are relevant to the progression of gender equality (gender)
  9. [we]…will continue to reach out to partners. (gender)
  10. We commit to make every effort to collectively increase the share of G7's bilateral allocable ODA advancing gender equality and women's and girls' empowerment over the coming years. (gender)
  11. To that end, we will support efforts to expand global access to quality childcare infrastructure including through our collective support of USD 79 million for the Childcare Incentive Fund, thereby improving women's economic empowerment, child outcomes, family welfare, and overall economic growth. (gender)
  12. We reaffirm our full commitment to achieve comprehensive SRHR of all individuals (gender)

Extremism, Disinformation, Foreign Interference and Corruption

  1. We are committed to providing security to all our citizens in an open and pluralistic society. (democracy)
  2. To this end, we will intensify our cooperation to fight all forms of violent extremism and terrorism. (terrorism)
  3. To halt democratic backsliding and undermining of our fundamental values, we will coordinate closely across the G7 and with our partners to strengthen democracies and our institutions against disinformation, including foreign information manipulation. (democracy)
  4. In light of Russia's war of aggression against Ukraine, we remain committed and enhance our cooperation through the G7 Rapid Response Mechanism (RRM) in order to protect our democratic systems and open societies from foreign threats, such as information manipulation and interference, including disinformation. (democracy)
  5. To this end, we will further develop the G7 RRM through an expanded focus on hybrid threats and will enhance its capabilities to respond to foreign interference also at the sub-national level. (democracy)
  6. More broadly, we will also enhance the resilience of public actors and institutions…through a whole-of-society-approach (democracy)
  7. [More broadly, we will also enhance the resilience of]…business…[through a whole-of-society-approach] (democracy)
  8. [More broadly, we will also enhance the resilience of]…academia…[through a whole-of-society-approach] (democracy)
  9. [More broadly, we will also enhance the resilience of]…civil society [through a whole-of-society-approach]  (democracy)
  10. [More broadly, we will also enhance]…cooperation within the OECD. (democracy)
  11. We also commit to further strengthening our internal security in light of transnational threats including those posed by Russia and other authoritarian regimes, particularly in the field of cyber security (democracy)
  12. [We also commit to further strengthening our internal security in light of transnational threats including those posed by Russia and other authoritarian regimes, particularly in the field of]…illicit finance (crime and corruption)
  13. [We also commit to further strengthening our internal security in light of transnational threats including those posed by Russia and other authoritarian regimes, particularly in the field of]…law enforcement. (crime and corruption)
  14. To further ensure the security of our citizens, we will intensify our fight against transnational organised crime, including cybercrime and environmental crime, particularly in fragile contexts, in close cooperation with civil society and international actors such as Interpol and United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. (crime and corruption)
  15. We commit to step up our fight against trafficking in human beings (human rights)
  16. [We commit to step up our]…efforts to prevent and combat child sexual abuse and exploitation globally, both online and offline. (human rights)
  17. We ask our Interior Ministers to take forward the implementation of the Action plan to combat Child Sexual Exploitation and Abuse from September 2021. (human rights)
  18. In order to defend the integrity and transparency of democratic systems, we will continue to step up our fight against corruption in all relevant bodies (democracy)
  19. [In order to defend the integrity and transparency of democratic systems, we will accelerate]…work on implementing and strengthening our beneficial ownership transparency registers, including by improving their accuracy, adequacy, and timeliness. (democracy)
  20. To hold kleptocrats, criminals and their enablers to account globally, we will broaden our global fight against cross-border corruption, including by supporting African partners in setting up 15 additional beneficial ownership registers. (crime and corruption)
  21. Also, building on the work of the Russia Elites Proxies and Oligarchs Task Force, we will further intensify our cooperation crime and corruption)
  22. [we]…ask the Task Force to report back to us by the end of the year on potential additional measures to be taken. (crime and corruption)

Digitalisation

  1. We will work together to help shape an inclusive and global digital ecosystem that fosters an open, free and secure Internet (digital economy)
  2. [We will work together to help shape an inclusive and global digital ecosystem that fosters]…competition and innovation (digital economy)
  3. [We will work together to help shape an inclusive and global digital ecosystem that fosters]…protects privacy and personal data (digital economy)
  4. [We will work together to help shape an inclusive and global digital ecosystem that fosters]…promotes respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms (digital economy)
  5. We affirm our commitment to empower citizens, especially vulnerable groups to use the Internet and digital technologies safely and securely. (digital economy)
  6. We will continue our efforts to combat any forms of online harm and protect people online. (digital economy)
  7. In this endeavour, we will build on already existing frameworks such as the Christchurch Call, the Paris Call for Trust and Security in the Cyberspace, and the outcomes of the Future Tech Forum. (terrorism)
  8. We are therefore taking steps to increase cyber resilience of digital infrastructure within and across our respective countries. (digital economy)
  9. We endorse the Joint Declaration on Cyber Resilience of Digital Infrastructure in response to the Russian war against Ukraine in this regard. (digital economy)
  10. We reaffirm our commitment to the framework of responsible state behaviour in cyberspace (digital economy)
  11. [We]…are working together to develop and implement robust international cyber norms. (digital economy)
  12. We are taking steps to strengthen our collective cyber defences, including in response to new and disruptive digital technologies, such as quantum computing (digital economy)
  13. [We]…will continue to work in close cooperation against the malicious use of cyberspace by both state and non-state actors. (digital economy)
  14. We will continue to discuss implementation of international norms and review of lessons-learned from existing efforts to include the attribution of cyber incidents, including by intensifying and elevating our cooperation on cyber within the relevant G7 Working Group. (digital economy)
  15. We will also continue to discuss ways to cooperate on emerging technologies, including new quantum-resistant cryptographic standards. (digital economy)
  16. We will support other states to increase digital access while ensuring that security, interoperability and respect for human rights are built into global connectivity. (digital economy)
  17. In this regard, we will better harness digital technologies for a net-zero, nature-positive, and resource-efficient economy and digital ecosystem. (digital economy)
  18. We reaffirm our support for international cooperation within the G7 and with like-minded partners to support the development of standards – based on inclusive multi-stakeholder approaches in line with our open, democratic values, and principles – and to further discussion on supporting standardisation towards digital and green transformations. (digital economy)
  19. We strengthen our efforts to facilitate data free flow with trust across borders (digital economy)
  20. [We strengthen our efforts to]…continue to harness opportunities (digital economy)
  21. [We strengthen our efforts to]…address challenges raised in particular in relation to security, privacy, data protection, and the protection of intellectual property rights. (digital economy)
  22. To this end, we endorse the Action Plan for Promoting Data Free Flow with Trust. (digital economy)
  23. Furthermore, we are commited to advancing the e-commerce Joint Statement Initative. (digital economy)
  24. We will continue the discussion on competition in digital markets, including with regards to platforms regulation and its implementation (digital economy)

Conclusion

  1. We stand ready to reconvene whenever necessary. (international cooperation)
  2. We will support the Indonesian G20 Presidency in finding solutions to the most pressing global issues. (international cooperation)

G7 Leaders' Communiqué – Executive Summary

  1. We underscore our resolve to, together with partners, jointly defend universal human rights (human rights)
  2. [We underscore our resolve to, together with partners, jointly defend universal]…democratic values (democracy)
  3. [We underscore our resolve to, together with partners, jointly defend]…the rules-based multilateral order (peace and security)
  4. [We underscore our resolve to, together with partners, jointly defend]…the resilience of our democratic societies. (democracy)
  5. We will stand with Ukraine for as long as it takes, providing the needed financial…support in its courageous defence of its sovereignty and territorial integrity. (regional security)
  6. [We will stand with Ukraine for as long as it takes, providing the needed]… humanitarian…[support in its courageous defence of its sovereignty and territorial integrity.] (regional security)
  7. [We will stand with Ukraine for as long as it takes, providing the needed]… military…[support in its courageous defence of its sovereignty and territorial integrity.] (regional security)
  8. [We will stand with Ukraine for as long as it takes, providing the needed]… diplomatic [support in its courageous defence of its sovereignty and territorial integrity.] (regional security)
  9. We are ready to reach arrangements together with interested countries and institutions and Ukraine on sustained security commitments to help Ukraine defend itself and to secure its free and democratic future. (regional security)
  10. Our financial support in 2022 amounts to more than USD 2.8 billion in humanitarian aid, and we are ready to grant, or have pledged and provided USD 29.5 billion in budget aid. (human rights)
  11. We are strongly committed to supporting Ukranian reconstruction through an international reconstruction conference and plan, drawn up and implemented by Ukraine in close coordination with international partners. (regional security)
  12. We will continue to impose severe and enduring costs on Russia to help bring an end to this war. (regional security)
  13. To this end, we remain steadfast in our commitment to our unprecedented coordination on sanctions for as long as necessary, acting in unison at every stage (regional security)
  14. [we]…will reduce Russia's revenues, including from gold. (regional security)
  15. We will help to stabilise and transform the global economy while tackling rising costs of living for our citizens. (macroeconomics)
  16. We will coordinate on our economic security (macroeconomics)
  17. [We will]…strengthen the resilience of supply chains (trade)
  18. [We will]…secure a level-playing field. (macroeconomics)
  19. We will take immediate action to secure energy supply and reduce price surges driven by extraordinary market conditions, including by exploring additional measures such as price caps. (energy)
  20. We reaffirm our commitment to phase out our dependency on Russian energy, without compromising on our climate and environmental goals. (energy)
  21. To protect people from hunger and malnutrition, and in response to Russia's weaponisation of grain, we will increase global food and nutrition security through the Global Alliance on Food Security. (food and agriculture)
  22. We will provide an additional USD 4.5 billion to this end (food and agriculture)
  23. [We will]…stand by our commitments to keep our food and agricultural markets open  (food and agriculture)
  24. [We will]…step up efforts to help Ukraine produce and export. (food and agriculture)
  25. We endorse the goals of an open and cooperative international Climate Club (climate change)
  26. [We]…will work with partners towards establishing it by the end of 2022. (climate change)
  27. To drive urgent, ambitious, and inclusive action to align ourselves with 1.5°C pathways and to accelerate implementation of the Paris Agreement, we commit to a highly decarbonised road sector by 2030 (climate change)
  28. [To drive urgent, ambitious, and inclusive action to align ourselves with 1.5°C pathways and to accelerate implementation of the Paris Agreement, we commit to]…a fully or predominantly decarbonised power sector by 2035 (climate change)
  29. [To drive urgent, ambitious, and inclusive action to align ourselves with 1.5°C pathways and to accelerate implementation of the Paris Agreement, we commit to]…prioritising concrete and timely steps towards the goal of accelerating phase-out of domestic unabated coal power. (energy)
  30. Through our Partnership for Global Infrastructure and Investment, we aim to mobilise USD 600 billion over the next five years to narrow the global investment gap. (infrastructure)
  31. We will step up our cooperation globally, including through working towards new Just Energy Transition Partnerships with Indonesia, India, Senegal and Vietnam, building on our existing partnership with South Africa. (energy)
  32. To overcome the current COVID-19 pandemic, we will build on our provision of over 1.175 billion vaccine doses since we last met. (health)
  33. We will also prevent, prepare, and respond to future pandemics and health challenges including through the G7 Pact for Pandemic Readiness. (health)
  34. Guided by the conviction that democratic values make us stronger in tackling global challenges, we will cooperate with civil society and our partners beyond the G7 to strengthen the resilience of our societies (democracy)
  35. [Guided by the conviction that democratic values make us stronger in tackling global challenges, we will cooperate with civil society and our partners beyond the G7 to]…promote human rights online and offline (human rights)
  36. [Guided by the conviction that democratic values make us stronger in tackling global challenges, we will cooperate with civil society and our partners beyond the G7 to]…address disinformation (democracy)
  37. [Guided by the conviction that democratic values make us stronger in tackling global challenges, we will cooperate with civil society and our partners beyond the G7 to]…achieve gender equality. (gender)
  38. With these joint commitments and actions taken today, and by working together with partners, we will make progress towards an equitable world. (international cooperation)

G7 Statement on Climate Club

  1. We aim to establish a Climate Club to support the effective implementation of the Paris Agreement by accelerating climate action and increasing ambition, with a particular focus on the industry sector, thereby addressing risks of carbon leakage for emission intensive goods, while complying with international rules. (climate change)
  2. We will work together, and with partners beyond the G7, to promote ambitious climate policy around the world. (climate change)
  3. We endorse the goals of and will work with partners towards establishing an open, cooperative international Climate Club, consistent with international rules, by the end of 2022. (climate change)
  4. We will each designate relevant Ministers to develop comprehensive terms of reference while reaching out to interested and ambitious partners, and to report back to Leaders for approval of next steps to establishment by the end of 2022. (climate change)
  5. We ask the OECD, the IMF, the World Bank, the IEA, and the WTO to support this process in line with their relevant expertise. (climate change)

G7 Statement on Support for Ukraine

  1. We, [the Leaders of the Group of Seven (G7), are steadfast in our solidarity with Ukraine, and] reaffirm our unwavering commitment to support the government and people of Ukraine in their courageous defence of their country's sovereignty and territorial integrity, and in their fight for a peaceful, prosperous and democratic future. (regional security)
  2. We will continue to provide financial…support (regional security)
  3. [We will continue to provide]…humanitarian…[support] (human rights)
  4. [We will continue to provide]…military…[support] (regional security)
  5. [We will continue to provide]…diplomatic support…[support] (regional security)
  6. [We will continue to]…stand with Ukraine for as long as it takes. (regional security)
  7. As we do so, we commit to demonstrate global responsibility and solidarity through working to address the international impacts of Russia's aggression, especially on the most vulnerable. (regional security)

Condemnation of Russia's war

  1. We [condemn and] will not recognise Russia's continued attempts to re-draw borders by force. (regional security)
  2. We [urge Russia to behave responsibly and exercise restraint, and] reiterate that any use of such weapons would be unacceptable and met with severe consequences. (regional security)

Supporting Ukrainian Efforts to End the War

  1. We are committed to helping Ukraine to uphold its sovereignty and territorial integrity, to defend itself, and to choose its own future. (regional security)
  2. We will continue to coordinate efforts to meet Ukraine's urgent requirements for military and defence equipment. (regional security)
  3. We will also continue to coordinate to provide Ukraine with the material, training and logistic, intelligence, and economic support to build up its armed forces. (regional security)

Commitment to Ukraine's Security and Resilience

  1. With a view to a viable post-war peace settlement, we are ready to reach arrangements together with interested countries and institutions and Ukraine on sustained security commitments to help Ukraine defend itself, secure its free and democratic future, and deter future Russian aggression. (regional security)
  2. We stand ready to further strengthen Ukraine's resilience by expanding our cooperation in intelligence and information sharing, information security, as well as maritime security. (regional security)
  3. We will continue supporting Ukraine in defending its networks against cyber incidents (regional security)
  4. [We will]…expand our cooperation in the fields of energy security (energy)
  5. [We will…expand our cooperation in the fields of]…the safety and security of nuclear material and facilities (energy)
  6. [We will…expand our cooperation in the fields of]…environmental…[issues] (environment)
  7. [We will…expand our cooperation in the fields of]…water use issues (environment)
  8. We will continue to support Ukraine in resisting threats to its democratic institutions and their common democratic values and principles, including through support for free media as well as countering disinformation and interference in democratic processes. (democracy)

Humanitarian Assistance

  1. We underline our shared commitment to continue to provide substantial and ongoing humanitarian support to those affected by Russia's war, in particular to protect the rights of women and children. (human rights)

Supporting Internally Displaced Persons and Refugees

  1. We reaffirm our resolve to protect and support forcibly displaced persons and refugees (human rights)
  2. [We reaffirm our resolve to]…provide relief to host countries. (human rights)
  3. We will enhance our support through the provision of short- and medium-term assistance (human rights)
  4. [We will enhance our support through]…strengthening access to a range of support services for those displaced and affected both in Ukraine as well as in other host countries. (human rights)
  5. To this end, we endorse the Moldova Support Platform. (human rights)
  6. We will seek to provide safe passage for refugees, including by further streamlining immigration procedures and visa requirements (human rights)
  7. [We will seek to provide safe passage for refugees, including by]…strengthening efforts to prevent and respond to the heightened risk of human trafficking among the refugee population, who are disproportionately women and children. (human rights)
  8. We aim to further facilitate the integration of refugees from Ukraine into our labour markets, to protect and ensure their labour rights, and to provide access to adequate social protection and education for as long as necessary. (human rights)

Compliance with International Humanitarian Law

  1. We also underline the need to ensure protection for neutral and impartial humanitarian organisations and their aid workers operating in Ukraine. (human rights)

Accountability for War Crimes

  1. We [welcome and] support the ongoing work to investigate war crimes and other atrocity crimes, including by the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC), the independent international commission of inquiry mandated by the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) and the work of the Expert Missions under the Moscow Mechanism of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe's (OSCE) as well as the national investigations by the Office of the Prosecutor General of Ukraine. (crime and corruption)
  2. We [welcome efforts to increase cooperation between all investigations taking place in Ukraine and] will intensify our police and judicial cooperation with Ukraine as well as with relevant organisations. (crime and corruption)

Safe Haven for Dissidents Fleeing Russia's Political Repression

  1. We will make available protection to Russians who are persecuted by the Russian regime, as consistent with our national laws and requirements. (human rights)

Increasing Food Security

  1. We are united and determined to strongly support Ukraine in producing and exporting grain, oil, and other agricultural products (trade)
  2. we will foster coordinated initiatives that promote global food security and address the causes of the evolving a global food crisis. (food and agriculture)

Sanctions

  1. We remain steadfast in our commitment to our unprecedented coordinated sanctions measures in response to Russia's war of aggression, the impacts of which will compound over time. (regional security)
  2. We are committed to sustaining and intensifying international economic and political pressure on President Putin's regime and its enablers in Belarus, depriving Russia of the economic means to persist in its war of aggression against Ukraine (regional security)
  3. we will continue our targeted use of coordinated sanctions for as long as necessary, acting in unison at every stage. (regional security)
  4. To this end, we endorse the annex on Supporting Ukraine Through Responsible Sanctions Against Russia. (regional security)

In order to further intensify our economic measures against Russia, we collectively commit to taking the following measures in the days and weeks ahead, consistent with our respective legal authorities and processes.

  1. We will continue to explore new ways to isolate Russia from participating in the global market (trade)
  2. [We will]…crack down on evasion. (crime and corruption)
  3. We are determined to reduce Russia's revenues, including from gold. (trade)
  4. We will also continue to target evasion and backfilling activities. (crime and corruption)
  5. We will further reduce Russia's export revenues by taking appropriate steps to further reduce dependency on Russian energy, as articulated in the Energy section of our Communique. (energy)
  6. We will continue to coordinate on tariff measures on imports from Russia (trade)
  7. [We will]…explore possible pathways in line with our respective legislation to use the revenues to assist Ukraine where applicable. (regional security)
  8. We will align and expand targeted sanctions to further restrict Russia's access to key industrial inputs, services, and technologies produced by our economies, particularly those supporting Russia's armament industrial base and technology sector. (regional security)
  9. we will increase the costs of Russia's war on Ukraine by imposing targeted sanctions on those responsible for war crimes, exercising illegitimate authority in Ukraine, and those standing behind Russia's engagement in efforts to increase global food insecurity by stealing and exporting Ukrainian grain or otherwise profit illegitimately from the war. (crime and corruption)
  10. As we impose severe costs on Russia and those who are complicit in its aggression, we will continue to assist the global economy and take action to help mitigate spillover effects, especially relating to humanitarian and other basic needs, and vulnerable populations. (macroeconomics)
  11. We will continue to ensure that in taking further measures, we are not targeting food and allow for the free flow of agricultural products and make every effort to minimise potential negative impacts and spillovers on third countries, in particular low- and middle-income countries. (food and agriculture)
  12. We are united in our commitment to fully implement and enforce these measures (accountability)
  13. [We are united in our commitment to]…remain vigilant against sanctions evasion and backfilling. (crime and corruption)

Financial and Economic Support

  1. As of today we are ready to grant, or have pledged and provided up to USD 29.5 billion of budget support in 2022 to help Ukraine close its financing gap and continue ensuring the delivery of basic services to the Ukrainian people. (regional security)
  2. We [welcome and] support ongoing work across international financial institutions (IFIs) on further substantial financing to Ukraine, notably the financial support from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, including the Bank's multi-donor financing vehicles for Ukraine and the establishment of the Fund's Multi-Donor Administered Account for Ukraine. (regional security)
  3. We will support the EBRD, including through providing specific support to critical infrastructure, notably to guarantee EBRD loans to gas, power, and transportation companies. (infrastructure)
  4. Across all our support, we are urgently working on accelerating disbursements of our financial commitments to Ukraine. (regional security)
  5. we commit to assisting Ukraine in maximising its export potential. (trade)
  6. We task Finance Ministers to continue to work with IFIs and with Ukraine to assess and address its financing needs. (regional security)
  7. We task G7 Trade Ministers to discuss concrete proposals to support Ukraine's recovery efforts through trade, including for example suspending tariffs on Ukrainian exports. (trade)

Reconstruction

  1. We recognise [the devastating destruction of infrastructure, including basic social and public infrastructure, cities, industry, and agricultural facilities in Ukraine, and] the urgent need for immediate reconstruction of critical infrastructure (infrastructure)
  2. We stand ready to support an international reconstruction plan, drawn up and implemented by Ukraine in close coordination with bilateral and multilateral partners and organisations in support of a sustainable, resilient, inclusive, and green economic recovery which enhances strong democratic institutions, rule of law, and anti-corruption measures. (regional security)
  3. We support the World Bank Group's support package to Ukraine and the EBRD's Resilience Package (regional security)
  4. [We support the]…ongoing work by the European Union and its Member States, considering a Ukraine reconstruction platform and a solidarity fund. (regional security)
  5. We are strongly committed to supporting Ukrainian reconstruction and will step up our respective efforts. (regional security)
  6. We will also explore other viable options to support Ukraine's humanitarian needs, early recovery, and reconstruction, including using frozen Russian assets consistent with our national laws.  (human rights)

Annex to G7 Statement on Support for Ukraine

  1. While recognising the primary responsibility of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) in maintaining international peace and security, we reaffirm our strong determination to act in coordination in response to Russia's war against Ukraine. (regional security)
  2. To help us deepen cooperation, we will review our response to Russia and identify areas of future cooperation, including mechanisms to protect our economic security and that of international partners. (regional security)
  3. We will continue to act in close cooperation with partners who are committed to this approach. (regional security)

G7 Chair's Summary: Joining Forces to Accelerate Clean and Just Transition towards Climate Neutrality

  1. Reaffirming their commitments to the Paris Agreement and the Glasgow Climate Pact to hold the global average temperature increase well below 2°C and resolving to pursue efforts to limit it to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, Leaders agreed to collaborate with a particular focus on energy policy reforms that accelerate the decarbonisation of economies towards net zero while ensuring universal access to affordable and sustainable energy and delivering socio-economic benefits and development opportunities in line with the 2030 Agenda, taking into consideration the specific conditions and development priorities of each country. (climate change)
  2. Leaders agreed to explore options for decarbonising the energy mix and accelerating the transition from dependency on fossil fuels (energy)
  3. [Leaders agreed to explore options for]…rapidly expanding clean and renewable energy sources and energy efficiency. (energy)
  4. This includes phasing down coal while increasing the share of renewable energies in the energy mix. (energy)
  5. Leaders agreed that phasing down unabated coal and scaling up clean and renewable energies needs to be environmentally and socially just, acknowledging contributions by approaches such as circular economy. (energy)
  6. They are committed to working together to jointly address potential negative impacts (energy)
  7. [They are committed to working together to]…facilitate the creation of new decent green jobs in clean and renewable energy and ecologically relevant sectors in general including through collaboration in research and development, innovation as well as capacity building. (energy)
  8. Recalling international commitments on climate finance, Leaders will use synergies with partnerships for global infrastructure and investment (climate change)
  9. [Recalling international commitments on climate finance, Leaders will use]… country platforms for improving, creating and mobilising infrastructure investments for clean and sustainable energy production and energy efficiency, including through large scale mobilisation of private capital. (energy)
  10. The Leaders recognised and supported strong partnerships such as Just Energy Transition Partnerships (JETPs) as a means to support the country-led transformation of sectors, capacity building and financing in collaboration with MDBs and other development finance or green finance institutions, the private sector as well as other partners. (energy)
  11. Moreover, G7 Leaders stressed their willingness to work on partnerships or similar initiatives with partner countries. (energy)
  12. [Acknowledging efforts and initiatives in this domain, including on lifestyle for the environment,] they welcomed progress in discussions to date and affirmed their intent to move forward in negotiations with Indonesia, India, Senegal and Vietnam on JETPs to support energy policy reforms, with a view to decarbonising energy systems and increasing energy efficiency. (energy)
  13. They stressed their commitment to work with Argentina to achieve climate neutrality by 2050. (climate change)
  14. Leaders agreed to review progress by COP 27. (climate change)

2022 Democratic Resiliencies Statement

  1. We, the Leaders of Germany, Argentina, Canada, France, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Senegal, South Africa, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, and the European Union, affirm our commitment to strengthening the resilience of our democracies (democracy)
  2. [We, the Leaders of Germany, Argentina, Canada, France, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Senegal, South Africa, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, and the European Union, affirm our commitment to]…working towards equitable, inclusive and sustainable solutions to global challenges, including climate change (climate change)
  3. [We, the Leaders of Germany, Argentina, Canada, France, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Senegal, South Africa, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, and the European Union, affirm our commitment to…working towards equitable, inclusive and sustainable solutions to global challenges, including]…the COVID-19 pandemic (health)
  4. [We, the Leaders of Germany, Argentina, Canada, France, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Senegal, South Africa, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, and the European Union]…reaffirm our commitment to the rules-based international order. (peace and security)
  5. Taking note of the 2021 Carbis Bay Open Societies Statement, and in recognition of the dramatic changes in the geopolitical situation since then and the significant threats to democratic systems around the world, we remain steadfast in our commitment to defending peace…as recognised by international law, including the United Nations Charter (peace and security)
  6. [Taking note of the 2021 Carbis Bay Open Societies Statement, and in recognition of the dramatic changes in the geopolitical situation since then and the significant threats to democratic systems around the world, we remain steadfast in our commitment to defending]…human rights…[as recognised by international law, including the United Nations Charter] (human rights)
  7. [Taking note of the 2021 Carbis Bay Open Societies Statement, and in recognition of the dramatic changes in the geopolitical situation since then and the significant threats to democratic systems around the world, we remain steadfast in our commitment to defending]…the rule of law…[as recognised by international law, including the United Nations Charter] (democracy)
  8. [Taking note of the 2021 Carbis Bay Open Societies Statement, and in recognition of the dramatic changes in the geopolitical situation since then and the significant threats to democratic systems around the world, we remain steadfast in our commitment to defending]…human security…[as recognised by international law, including the United Nations Charter] (peace and security)
  9. [Taking note of the 2021 Carbis Bay Open Societies Statement, and in recognition of the dramatic changes in the geopolitical situation since then and the significant threats to democratic systems around the world, we remain steadfast in our commitment to defending]…gender equality, [as recognised by international law, including the United Nations Charter] (gender)
  10. We [hail all courageous defenders of democratic systems that stand against oppression and violence, and] will step up international cooperation to improve the resilience of democratic societies globally. (democracy)
  11. We commit to engage with partners internationally for peace and prosperity (peace and security)
  12. [We]…will work for progress towards an equitable world (peace and security)

Global Responsibility: Democracies as Reliable Partners

  1. As democracies, we seek to promote a rules-based international order (peace and security)
  2. [As democracies, we seek to]…respect other states' territorial integrity and sovereignty (peace and security)
  3. [As democracies, we seek to]…respect and defend the principles enshrined in the UN Charter (peace and security)
  4. [As democracies, we seek to]…support the peaceful resolution of conflicts (peace and security)
  5. [As democracies, we seek to]…oppose the threat or use of force of any kind that is not in compliance with international law (peace and security)
  6. [As democracies, we seek to]…protect human rights (human rights)
  7. [As democracies, we seek to]…strengthen multilateral institutions to address global challenges (peace and security)
  8. [As democracies, we seek to]…develop and use technologies in accordance with democratic principles for the benefit of humanity. (democracy)

In sharing these values, we are stronger together and commit to:

  1. Supporting democracy worldwide (democracy)
  2. [Supporting]…free and fair elections, including through electoral assistance; (democracy)
  3. In the spirit of partnership fighting climate change (climate change)
  4. [In the spirit of partnership]…preventing environmental degradation and loss of biodiversity (environment)
  5. [In the spirit of partnership]…mobilising climate finance (climate change)
  6. [In the spirit of partnership]…supporting a just, equitable and socially inclusive transformation agenda (climate change)
  7. [In the spirit of partnership]…ensuring an orderly fair and equitable energy transition, taking into account energy security, national development priorities, viable and affordable technologies (energy)
  8. [In the spirit of partnership]…cooperating closely in the run-up to the 27th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP27) (climate change)
  9. Improving food security to prevent famine (food and agriculture)
  10. striving for energy security by ensuring resilient energy supply chains, [noting in this context the UN Global Crisis Response Group initiative] (energy)
  11. Pursuing concerted efforts to overcome the COVID-19 pandemic (health)
  12. [Pursuing concerted efforts to improve]…vaccine distribution and production (health)
  13. [Pursuing concerted efforts to improve]…our global health architecture for future health crises, with the World Health Organization (WHO) in a central role (health)
  14. Fighting corruption (crime and corruption)
  15. [Fighting]…illicit financial flows (crime and corruption)
  16. [Fighting]…organised crime (crime and corruption)
  17. [Fighting]…cybercrimes (crime and corruption)
  18. [Fighting]…other illicit activities, including through enhanced beneficial ownership transparency (international taxation)
  19. Advocating free, fair, non-discriminatory, rules-based and sustainable trade (trade)
  20. alleviating global inequalities (social policy)
  21. raising standards of living (social policy)
  22. maintaining open and resilient economies and strengthening the multilateral trading system, including by reforming the World Trade Organization (WTO) (IGO reform)
  23. Supporting efforts to push for sustainable solutions to mounting global sovereign debt, in particular within the G20 Common Framework for Debt Treatments beyond the Debt Service Suspension Initiative for debtors in need, while continuing to explore further solutions for vulnerable countries, including Middle Income Countries (development)
  24. Fighting global inequalities and exclusions deepened during the pandemic (social policy)
  25. pursuing inclusive policies to secure recovery (macroeconomics)
  26. intensifying our efforts to meet the Sustainable Development Goals of the 2030 Agenda (development)
  27. strengthening the means of implementation and revitalising the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development, including by promoting equal partnerships through the G20 Compact with Africa, [taking note also of G7 efforts for infrastructure investment.] (development)

Information Environment: Democracies Defending Open and Pluralistic Debate
We are prepared to defend these principles and are resolved to:

  1. Protecting the freedom of expression and opinion online and offline (democracy)
  2. ensuring a free and independent media landscape through our work with relevant international initiatives; (democracy)
  3. Ensuring an open, free, global, interoperable, reliable and secure internet (digital economy)
  4. Increasing the cyber resilience of digital infrastructure, including by improving and sharing awareness of cyber threats and expanding cyber response cooperation (digital economy)
  5. Countering hybrid threats, in particular information manipulation and interference, including disinformation (democracy)
  6. Cooperating to counter information manipulation (democracy)
  7. [Cooperating to]…promote accurate information (democracy)
  8. [Cooperating to]…advocate for our shared democratic values worldwide (democracy)
  9. Promoting affordable access to diverse sources of reliable and trustworthy information and data, online and offline, including through a multi-stakeholder approach, and by strengthening digital skills and digital literacy (democracy)
  10. Enhancing transparency about the actions of online platforms to combat violent, extremist and inciting content online in line with the Christchurch Call to Action. (terrorism)

Civil Society: Democracies Protecting and Fostering Open and Pluralistic Civic Spaces
We commit to:

  1. Guarding the freedom, independence and diversity of civil society actors, speaking out against threats to civic space (democracy)
  2. respecting freedom of association and peaceful assembly; (democracy)
  3. Building resilience against malign foreign interference and acts of transnational repression that seek to undermine trust in government, society and media, reduce civic space and silence critical voices (democracy)
  4. Advancing programmes for the protection of human rights defenders and all those exposing corruption (human rights)
  5. Promoting academic freedom and strengthening the role of scientific evidence and research in democratic debate; (democracy)
  6. Protecting civic space (democracy)
  7. upholding transparent, accountable, inclusive and participatory governance, including by advancing women's full, equal and meaningful participation and leadership in civic and political life. (gender)

Inclusion and Equality: Democracies Promoting Equal Representation
We commit to:

  1. Protecting freedom of ght, conscience, religion or belief (democracy)
  2. promoting inter-faith dialogue (democracy)
  3. Promoting social cohesion, solidarity and the inclusion of all members of society, online and offline, while denouncing all forms of discrimination and violence (democracy)
  4. Promoting gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls, including through supporting girls' access to education and by implementing gender mainstreaming across all our policies (gender)
  5. Ensuring full, equal and meaningful participation and representation of all those people in vulnerable situations (democracy)

G7 Leaders' Statement on the Missile Attack on a Shopping Mall in Kremenchuck

  1. Today, we underlined our unwavering support for Ukraine in the face of the Russian aggression, an unjustified war of choice that has been raging for 124 days. (regional security)
  2. We will continue to provide financial…support for Ukraine, for as long as it takes. (regional security)
  3. [We will continue to provide]…humanitarian…[for Ukraine, for as long as it takes.] (human rights)
  4. [We will continue to provide]…military support [for Ukraine, for as long as it takes.] (regional security)
  5. We will not rest until Russia ends its cruel and senseless war on Ukraine. (regional security)

G7 Statement on Global Food Security

  1. We, the Leaders of the G7, will spare no effort to increase global food and nutrition security and to protect the most vulnerable, whom the food crisis threatens to hit the hardest. (food and agriculture)

The Challenge

  1. In our pursuit to ensure that all people can realise their right to adequate food, we reaffirm our goal to lift 500 million people out of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, as resolved in the 2015 G7 Elmau commitment. (food and agriculture)

Our Response: Global Alliance for Food Security

  1. Therefore, and in strong support of the UN GCRG, we are building the Global Alliance for Food Security jointly with the World Bank as a coordinated and solidarity response to the challenges ahead.  (food and agriculture)
  2. We will cooperate closely with international partners beyond the G7 with the aim of transforming political commitments into concrete actions, as planned by various initiatives such as the Team Europe's response to global food insecurity and the Food and Agriculture Resilience Mission (FARM), the Roadmap for Global Food Security – Call to Action, and key regional outreach initiatives, including towards African countries and with the Mediterranean Ministerial Dialogue on the Food Security Crisis as well as the Uniting for Global Food Security Ministerial Conference. (food and agriculture)

Our Actions
In our commitment to the Global Alliance for Food Security:

  1. We commit to an additional USD 4.5 billion to protect the most vulnerable from hunger and malnutrition, amounting to a total of over USD 14 billion as our joint commitment to global food security this year. (food and agriculture)
  2. We will step up our efforts to help Ukraine to keep producing agricultural products in view of the next harvest season (food and agriculture)
  3. [We]…commit to supporting Ukrainian farmers in gaining access to essential agricultural inputs and veterinary medicines. (food and agriculture)
  4. We are strongly supporting Ukraine in resuming its agricultural exports to world markets (food and agriculture)
  5. [We are strongly supporting]…UN efforts to unlock a safe maritime corridor through the Black Sea. (food and agriculture)
  6. Additionally, we will step up our efforts to establish alternative routes building on the already implemented EU "Solidarity Lanes" initiative. (food and agriculture)
  7. Working with relevant agencies and partners we will collaborate to identify the provenance of grain imports, with the aim of identifying illegally seized Ukrainian products and deterring Russia from continuing its illegal seizures.  (food and agriculture)
  8. We will continue to ensure that our sanctions packages are not targeting food and allow for the free flow of agricultural products, including from Russia, and the delivery of humanitarian assistance. (food and agriculture)
  9. We commit to sustainably increase the availability of agricultural products including through strengthening agricultural productivity particularly in the most affected countries to build their resilience and support domestic production. (food and agriculture)
  10. We will strive to address fertiliser shortages by supporting more efficient and targeted usage, temporarily increasing local and global production as appropriate, and promoting alternatives to inorganic fertiliser. (food and agriculture)
  11. We will continue to address food loss and waste and the promotion of balanced and healthy diets. (food and agriculture)
  12. We support the initiative carried out by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), in coordination with the African Union (AU), to design a strategic investment plan to accelerate development of value chains essential for Africa's food resilience. (food and agriculture)
  13. We stand by our commitment to keep our food and agricultural markets open (food and agriculture)
  14. We commit to strengthen our support to the G20 Agricultural Market Information System (AMIS), including by providing additional financial resources as well as timely data and transparent information (food and agriculture)
  15. We will fight against any speculative behaviour that endangers food security or access to nutritious food for vulnerable countries or populations. (food and agriculture)
  16. We will ensure that our response to the current challenges also strengthens the long-term resilience and sustainability of agriculture and food systems, in alignment with the Sustainable Development Goals, the Paris Agreement and Glasgow Pact, the Convention to Combat Desertification and the Convention on Biological Diversity, including via increasing our support to smallholder farmers. (food and agriculture)
  17. In this context, we support the crucial work of all relevant multilateral organisations, including the Rome-based agencies WFP, Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and IFAD as well as the Committee on World Food Security (CFS), the WTO and international financial institutions (food and agriculture)
  18. We commit to continued engagement with and support for the UN Food Systems Summit's objectives (food and agriculture)
  19. We support country- and region-led plans and solutions to address food insecurity, building on the work of the AU's 2022 Year of Nutrition. (food and agriculture)
  20. We also commit to scaling up essential nutrition services in countries with the highest burden of malnutrition.

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Appendix C: Money Mobilized at the 2022 Elmau Summit

Date

Announcement

Recommitted Money (USD)

New Money (USD)

Total New Money (USD)          

2022.06.21

EU pledged $630 million to help vulnerable nations weather a food security crisis worsened by Russia's war on Ukraine.
$158 million in humanitarian assistance for African, Caribbean and Pacific nations
$370 million to boost sustainable food production in the long-term

 

$630 million

$630 million
= $0.63 billion

2022.06.23

CHOGM: Canada announces $250 million to address the global food security crisis, with a focus on Sub-Saharan Africa.

 

$250 million

$250 million
= $0.25 billion

2022.06.23

CHOGM: Canada announces $246.5 million to advance action in global health, gender equality, sexual and reproductive health
$94 million for education
$120 for gender equality and women empowerment, sexual and reproductive health in Commonwealth countries

 

$246.5 million

$246.5 million
= $0.2465 billion

2022.06.23

CHOGM: UK pledged $456 million in aid to countries hit hardest by rising global food costs and shortages of fertiliser, including 130 million pounds for the World Food Programme.

 

$456 million
= $0.456 billion

$456 million
= $0.456 billion

2022.06.25

UK announces $525 million in guarantees for World Bank lending this year for Ukraine.

 

$525 million
= $0.525 billion

$525 million
= $0.525 billion

2022.06.26

G7 leaders pledged to raise $600 billion in private and public funds over five years to finance infrastructure in developing countries.
US: $200 billion

 

$600 billion

$600 billion

2022.06.26

Germany and its development banks pledge to provide promotional loans of 300 million euros for economic reforms and to support the Joint Energy Transition Partnerships.

 

300 million Euros

300 million Euros
= $316 million
= $0.316 billion

2022.06.26

For the Emerging Markets Action Fund, Germany will contribute €30 million of the €25 million it made available last year. The fund can contribute up to 50 euros of private capital for every euro of public money. In this way Germany can mobilize up to 2.75 billion euros.

 

30 million Euros

30 million Euros
= $31.6 million
= $0.031 billion

2022.06.26

UK will mobilize £10 million in materials and equipment to Ukraine Railways to repair rail infrastructure and help get grain out of the country by rail. The UK will put £1.5 million to develop a testing process to identify whether grain sold by Russia on the world market has been illegally taken from Ukraine.

 

10 million Euros

10 million Euros
= $0.01 billion

2022.06.27

G7 looks forward to additional planned support to Ukrainian state-owned enterprises and the private sector through the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and the International Finance Corporation which amounts to USD 3.5 billion.

 

$3.5 billion

$3.5 billion

2022.06.27

Canada pledges $50 million toward grain storage in Ukraine

 

$50 million

$50 million
= $0.05 billion

2022.06.28

G7 commits to an additional USD 4.5 billion to protect the most vulnerable from hunger and malnutrition, amounting to a total of over USD 14 billion as our joint commitment to global food security this year.

 

$4.5 billion

$4.5 billion

2022.06.28

G7 will support efforts to expand global access to quality
childcare infrastructure including through our collective support of USD 79 million for the
Childcare Incentive Fund, thereby improving women's economic empowerment, child
outcomes, family welfare, and overall economic growth.

 

$79 million

$79 million
= $0.079 billion

Total

 

 

 

$610.59 billion

Notes:
New money announced between Sunday, June 26th and Tuesday, June 28th, 2022, including one week before the summit.
Compiled by Angela Minyi Hou.
As of 1700 CET, June 28, 2022.

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