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2018 G7 Charlevoix Summit Interim Compliance Report

10 June 2018 to 10 December 2018
Angela Min Yi Hou, Julia Tops, and Cindy Xinying Ou
G7 Research Group

25 February 2019

The 2018 G7 Charlevoix Summit Interim Compliance Report reviews progress made on 20 selected commitments set out at the 2018 Charlevoix Summit for the period of 10 June 2018 to 10 December 2018 (see Table A). The preface and summary of the findings are listed below. The 2018 G7 Charlevoix Interim Compliance Scores, with rankings by country and by issue.

Download the full 439-page report here.

The report contains the following sections, which can be downloaded separately:

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Preface

Each year since 1996, the G7 Research Group has produced a compliance report on the progress made by the G7 members in meeting the commitments their leaders issue at each summit. Since 2002, the group has usually published an interim report to assess progress at the time of the transition from the outgoing presidency to incoming presidency, in addition to the final report issued just before the annual summit. These reports, which monitor a carefully chosen selection of the many commitments announced at the end of each summit, are offered to the general public and to policy makers, academics, civil society, the media and interested citizens around the world in an effort to make the work of the G7 more transparent and accessible, and to provide scientific data to enable meaningful analysis of this unique and informal institution. Compliance reports are available at the G7 Information Centre at www.g7.utoronto.ca/compliance.

Based at the University of Toronto and founded in 1987, the G7 Research Group strives to be the leading independent source of information and analysis on the institutions, performance, issues and participants of the G7 summit and system of global governance. It is a global network of scholars, students and professionals. The group oversees the G7 Information Centre, which publishes freely available research on the G7 as well as official documents issued by the G7.

For the interim and final compliance reports on the 2018 Charlevoix Summit, hosted by Canada on June 8–9, 2018, 20 priority commitments were selected from the total 315 commitments made. This interim report covers actions taken by G7 members between 10 June 2018 until 10 December 2018. The final report will cover the full period between the day after the Charlevoix Summit until the eve of the Biarritz Summit that France will host on 24–26 August 2019.

To make its assessments, the G7 Research Group relies on publicly available information, documentation and media reports. To ensure the accuracy, comprehensiveness and integrity of these reports, we encourage comments and suggestions. Indeed, this is a living document, and the scores can be recalibrated if new material becomes available. All feedback remains anonymous and is never attributed. Responsibility for this report's contents lies exclusively with the report's authors and the analysts of the G7 Research Group.

This report is produced entirely on a voluntary basis. It receives no direct financial support from any source, by a process insulated from the other major activities of the G7 Research Group, such as the "background books" produced GT Media or the pre-summit conferences sponsored by various institutions.

The work of the G7 Research Group would not be possible without the steadfast dedication of many people around the world. This report is the product of a team of energetic and hard-working analysts led by Angela Min Yi Hou and Julia Tops, co-chairs of summit studies, and Cindy Xinying Ou, editor-in-chief, and their team of lead analysts and analysts. It would also not be possible without the support of Dr. Ella Kokotsis, director of accountability, and Brittaney Warren, senior researcher. We are also indebted to the many people who provide feedback on our drafts, whose comments will be carefully considered in the published report.

John Kirton
Director
G7 Research Group

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Executive Summary

The University of Toronto G7 Research Group's Interim Compliance Report on the 2018 Charlevoix Summit assesses the compliance of the G7 members with 20 priority commitments selected from the total 315 made at their summit in Canada on 8-9 June 2018 (See Table A). This selection reflects the breadth and focus of the summit agenda. The analysis covers actions taken by G7 members since 10 June 2018, the day after the summit, until 10 December 2018.

The Interim Compliance Score

Compliance is measured on a three-point scale. A score of +1 indicates full compliance with a commitment, a score of 0 indicates partial compliance, and a score of −1 indicates non-compliance as in a failure to comply or action taken that is directly opposite to the commitment. The interim compliance scores are listed in Table B.

For the period of 10 June 2018 to 10 December 2018, the average compliance score for these 20 commitments was +0.52 (76 percent ). This is a decrease from the 2017 Taormina final compliance score of +0.60 (80 percent) but is a slight increase from the 2017 interim compliance score of +0.44 (72 percent). Table C contains score since 2015.

Compliance by Member

The European Union ranked first with an average compliance score of +0.85 (93 percent), followed by Canada and the United Kingdom at +0.70 (85 percent), Japan at +0.58 (79 percent) and France at +0.45 (73 percent). Italy had the lowest score at +0.15 (58 percent). Japan's average is calculated based on 19 commitments as it was not party to the commitment on Ocean Plastics Charter and the average for the United States was calculated based on 18 commitments as it was not party to the commitments on Ocean Plastics Charter and the Paris Agreement. Table C contains the scores by country.

Compliance by Commitment

Three commitments had complete compliance of +1.00 (100 percent): the commitment on climate change and the Paris Agreement, the African Union's Agenda 2063, and skills and education. These were followed by the commitments on inclusive growth and on international development partnerships and private sector investment at +0.88 (94 percent). The lowest scores were the commitments on sexual and gender-based violence in digital contexts at −0.13 (44 percent) and on climate change insurance risk at −0.25 (38 percent). Table D contains the scores by commitment.

The Compliance Gap Between Members

These interim results from the Charlevoix Summit show a difference of 0.70 between the highest and lowest compliance scores, a smaller spread than the 2017 final compliance gap of 0.78 but marginally higher than the 2017 interim gap of 0.69.

Future Research and Reports

The information contained within this report provides G7 members and other stakeholders with an indication of their compliance with 20 commitments at the midway point between the Charlevoix Summit in June 2018 and the Biarritz Summit in August 2019. As with previous compliance reports, this report has been produced as an invitation for others to provide additional or more complete information on country compliance. Comments are always welcomed and would be considered as part of an analytical reassessment. Please send your feedback to g7@utoronto.ca.

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Table A: 2018 Priority Commitments Selected for Assessment*

Number Commitment
40 "We commit to take concerted action in responding to foreign actors who seek to undermine our democratic societies and institutions, our electoral processes, our sovereignty and our security as outlined in the Charlevoix Commitment on Defending Democracy from Foreign Threats."
234 "In accordance with applicable laws, ensure a high level of transparency around sources of funding for political parties and all types of political advertising, especially during election campaigns."
17 "We will work together to enforce existing international rules and develop new rules where needed to foster a truly level playing field, addressing in particular non-market oriented policies and practices, and inadequate protection of intellectual property rights, such as forced technology transfer or cyber-enabled theft."
5 "We will continue monitoring market developments and using all policy tools to support strong, sustainable, balanced and inclusive growth that generates widespread prosperity."
30 "We are resolved to ensure that all workers have access to the skills and education necessary to adapt and prosper in the new world of work brought by innovation through emerging technologies."
19 "To support growth and equal participation that benefits everyone, and ensure our citizens lead healthy and productive lives, we commit to bringing greater attention to mental health."
53 "We reiterate our commitment to work in partnership with the African continent, supporting the African Union Agenda 2063 in order to realize Africa's potential."
116 "Fostering new international development partnerships, and capacity to mobilize more private sector investments for sustainable international development, with particular attention to inclusive growth."
136 "Supporting development finance programs that strive to advance women's economic empowerment and gender equality while promoting mutually reinforcing economic prosperity and stability in partner countries, including by providing access to capital that enhance economic opportunities for women."
261 "We encourage the collection, analysis, dissemination and use of gender-sensitive data to bridge gaps in understanding the way women and girls are impacted by risks and catastrophic events, and how they can be engaged in developing and implementing solutions."
66 "Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the European Union reaffirm their strong commitment to implement the Paris Agreement, through ambitious climate action; in particular through strengthening and financing resilience and reducing vulnerability."
252 "We will explore broadening disaster risk insurance coverage, including through global and regional facilities, such as the InsuResilience Global Partnership, to extend high-quality insurance coverage to vulnerable developing countries and beneficiaries in need and to encourage new types of insurance products for emerging risks."
256 "We intend to leverage innovation in the field of Earth observation technologies and related applications and make them broadly available in the poorest and most vulnerable regions of the world in order to support … infrastructure and building design (environment)"
243 "Our efforts will support resilient and quality infrastructure in coasts and coastal communities, particularly in SIDS. This will include advancing the development and deployment of clean and resilient energy systems, including from renewable sources."
289 "Supporting secondary markets for plastics including using policy measures and developing international incentives, standards or requirements for product stewardship, design and recycled content."
276 "Further, we will promote the harmonization of monitoring methodologies for marine litter and collaboration on research on its impacts, in cooperation, for example with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to facilitate this work."
63 "We commit to ongoing action to strengthen our collective energy security and demonstrate leadership in ensuring that our energy systems continue to drive sustainable economic growth."
176 "We will ensure commitment to gender equality and prioritize improved access to quality education for girls and women in the early stages of humanitarian response and peacebuilding efforts, while supporting schools as safe spaces for children."
113 "Support gender equality in labour market opportunities and in the distribution of unpaid care work, with measures such as paid maternity leave and parental leave, as well as initiatives to ensure women's equal access to decent employment opportunities, leadership opportunities, resources and finance."
217 "Mobilize the international community, including through working with] civil society [to develop strategies to improve prevention of and response to sexual and gender-based abuse, harassment and the threat of violence in digital contexts and learn lessons from current models of industry-government collaboration on emerging digital challenges."

* For the full list of commitments, please contact the G7 Research Group at g7@utoronto.ca.

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Table B: 2018 G7 Charlevoix Summit Interim Compliance Scores

 

Canada

France

Germany

Italy

Japan

United Kingdom

United States

European Union

Average

1 Democracy: Terrorism +1 +1 +1 −1 0 +1 +1 +1 +0.63 81%
2 Democracy: Transparency +1 −1 −1 0 0 +1 0 +1 +0.13 56%
3 Trade: International Rules and Intellectual Property Rights 0 +1 +1 0 0 −1 −1 +1 +0.13 56%
4 Macroeconomics: Inclusive Growth +1 +1 +1 0 +1 +1 +1 +1 +0.88 94%
5 Labour and Employment: Skills and Education +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1.00 100%
6 Health: Mental Health 0 0 0 +1 0 +1 0 +1 +0.38 69%
7 Development: African Union Agenda 2063 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1.00 100%
8 Development: International Development Partnerships and Private Sector Investments +1 +1 +1 0 +1 +1 +1 +1 +0.88 94%
9 Gender: Development Finance 0 0 0 +1 −1 +1 +1 +1 +0.38 69%
10 Climate Change: Gender +1 +1 +1 −1 +1 +1 +1 +0.71 86%
11 Climate Change: Paris Agreement +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1.00 100%

12

Climate Change: Insurance Risk

0

-1

+1

−1

0

0

−1

0

−0.25

38%

13 Environment: Earth Observation Technologies 0 +1 0 0 +1 +1 0 +1 +0.50 75%
14 Environment: Coastal Resilience +1 0 0 0 +1 +1 +1 +1 +0.63 81%
15 Environment: Ocean Plastics Charer +1 +1 0 0 +1 +1 +0.67 83%
16 Environment: Marine Litter +1 0 0 0 +1 +1 0 +1 +0.50 75%
17 Energy: Energy Security 0 0 +1 0 +1 0 0 +1 +0.38 69%
18 Gender: Quality Education for Girls and Women +1 0 0 0 +1 +1 -1 +1 +0.38 69%
19 Gender: Equality in Labour Markets +1 0 0 +1 +1 +1 +1 0 +0.63 81%
20 Gender: Sexual and Gender-Based Violence in Digital Contexts +1 +1 −1 0 0 −1 −1 0 −0.13 44%

 

2018 Interim Compliance Average +0.70 +0.45 +0.40 +0.15 +0.58 +0.70 +0.24 +0.85

+0.52

76%

85% 73% 70% 58% 79% 85% 62% 93%

N/A = Not applicable.

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Table C: 2018 Charlevoix Summit Interim Compliance Scores by Country

  2018
interim
2017
final
2017 interim 2016
final
2016
interim
2015
final
2015
interim
European Union +0.85 93% +0.95 98% +0.94 97% +0.67 84% +0.91 96% +1.00 100% +1.00 100%
United Kingdom +0.70 85% +0.84 92% +0.56 78% +0.53 77% +0.64 82% +0.86 93% +0.88 94%
Canada +0.70 85% +0.68 84% +0.44 72% +0.58 79% +0.55 78% +0.48 74% +0.18 59%
Japan +0.58 79% +0.47 74% +0.25 63% +0.28 64% +0.18 59% +0.48 74% +0.47 74%
France +0.45 73% +0.68 84% +0.50 75% +0.26 63% +0.27 64% +0.67 84% +0.59 80%
Germany +0.40 70% +0.63 82% +0.44 72% +0.67 84% +0.55 78% +0.90 95% +0.88 94%
United States +0.24 62% +0.17 59% +0.13 57% +0.63 82% +0.82 91% +0.81 91% +0.65 83%
Italy +0.15 58% +0.37 69% +0.31 66% +0.21 61% +0.18 59% +0.24 62% +0.18 59%
Average +0.50 74% +0.60 80% +0.44 72% +0.49 75% +0.51 76% +0.68 84% +0.60 80%
Spread 0.70   0.78   0.69   0.46   0.73   0.76   0.82  

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Table D: 2018 Charlevoix Summit Interim Compliance Scores by Issue

1 Climate Change: Paris Agreement +1.00 100%
Development: African Union Agenda 2063
Labour and Employment: Skills and Education
4 Development: International Development Partnerships +0.88 94%
Macroeconomics: Inclusive Growth
6 Climate Change: Gender +0.71 86%
7 Environment: Ocean Plastics Charter +0.67 83%
8 Democracy: Terrorism +0.63 81%
Environment: Coastal Resilience
Gender: Equality in Labour Markets
11 Environment: Earth Observation Technologies +0.50 75%
Environment: Marine Litter
13 Energy: Energy Security +0.38 69%
Gender: Development Finance
Gender: Quality Education for Girls and Women
Health: Mental Health
17 Democracy: Transparency +0.13 56%
Trade: International Rules and Intellectual Property Rights
19 Gender: Sexual and Gender-Based Violence in Digital Contexts −0.13 44%
20 Climate Change: Insurance Risk −0.25 38%

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